Jeb Bush's Common Core Hedging Undermines Reform Efforts

Jeb Bush, the former Florida governor and prospective GOP presidential contender, was wrong to...

Medicaid Expansion Hits California Budget

California’s budget has taken a billion-dollar hit as a result of the state’s decision to embrace...

Haslem’s Insure Tennessee Proposal Debuts to Mixed Reception

In recent months, Republican governors in several states—including Pennsylvania, Indiana, Utah, and...

Thirty Years Promoting Freedom

Very few organizations survive 30 years, and very few people work for the same organization for...

‘Right to Try’ Could Bring Hope to Tennessee Patients

Legislation introduced in Tennessee could give patients speedy access to drugs that have been...

Millennials Must Recognize Need for Public Pension System Reform

After the midterm election results, there has been much talk about the young people who didn’t turn...
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Education

Jeb Bush's Common Core Hedging Undermines Reform Efforts

Jeb Bush, the former Florida governor and prospective GOP presidential contender, was wrong to support Common Core. Now, on the campaign trail, he appears to be backtracking a bit. He should go all the way and admit he was wrong in the first place.  In a speech this past November, Bush said, “In my view, the rigor of the Common Core State Standards must be the new minimum in...

Environment

UN Peru Meeting Produces Ineffectual ‘Nonbinding’ Climate Accord

More than 200 countries attended the United Nations’ 20th Conference of the Parties to the 1992 Framework Convention on Climate Change in December in Lima, Peru, producing a global pact to reduce CO2 and other greenhouse gas emission purportedly causing global warming. Negotiators from each nation drafted an accord, in which every country, developed or not, agrees to reduce or cap greenhouse gas...

Kansas, Nebraska Fight EPA’s Rule on Ethanol Emissions

Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt and Nebraska Attorney General Jon Bruning have joined the Energy Future Coalition and the Urban Air Initiative in a lawsuit challenging the Environmental Protection Agency’s new regulations changing how ethanol emissions are monitored. The lawsuit was filed in the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals on December 2, 2014. The new EPA regulations, known as Moves2014,...

Memo Reveals Bogus EPA Climate Strategy

Climate Change Weekly #157 A memo released as part of an ongoing Freedom of Information Act request examining the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) rule-making has arguably revealed EPA uses misleading claims to stoke fears of global warming. The March 2009 memo shows EPA feared it was losing support for its climate efforts because opinion polls consistently showed the public ranked...

Finance & Insurance

Self-Regulating ‘Sharing Economy’ Connects Buyers and Sellers

Businesses such as Airbnb or Uber, which directly connect consumers and service providers without the need for middlemen, empower consumers and create a self-regulating economy, according to a recent study from the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. As consumers’ power grows in the “sharing economy,” the need for government consumer protection declines. The paper defines a sharing...

A Well-Written Overview of Governments’ Economic Misdeeds

The Impending Monetary Revolution, the Dollar and Gold, Second Edition By Edmund Contoski; American Liberty Publishers, November 2014 281 pages, ISBN-13 978-0-9655007-1-5 $28.95 on publisher’s website, http://www.amlibpub.com/order.html The first edition of Edmund Contoski’s book The Impending Monetary Revolution, the Dollar and Gold was excellent, and it makes an outstanding textbook for a...

Study: Housing Bubble, Rising Caused Consumer Retail Prices to Rise

A new study has uncovered evidence the 2000s housing bubble affected the U.S. economy in previously unsuspected ways, by causing consumer prices to rise and fall based on the rate of homeownership in any particular area. In “House Prices, Local Demand, and Retail Prices,” New York University Assistant Professor of Finance Johannes Stroebel and University of Chicago Assistant Professor of...

Health

Haslem’s Insure Tennessee Proposal Debuts to Mixed Reception

In recent months, Republican governors in several states—including Pennsylvania, Indiana, Utah, and Wyoming—have considered new proposals to expand their states’ Medicaid programs. Each of the states, which have resisted expansion so far, have considered plans including what they call free-market alternatives to the often unpopular Affordable Care Act. The most recent governor to propose a...

Medicaid Expansion Hits California Budget

California’s budget has taken a billion-dollar hit as a result of the state’s decision to embrace the Medicaid expansion offered through the Affordable Care Act, and faces billions more in future years. Enrollment in Medi-Cal has grown from fewer than 8 million people in 2013 to nearly 12 million in 2014, largely as a result of the Medicaid expansion. Most of those costs are covered by federal...

‘Right to Try’ Could Bring Hope to Tennessee Patients

Legislation introduced in Tennessee could give patients speedy access to drugs that have been proven safe and show promise in treating their medical conditions but have yet to clear all the hurdles of the federal drug approval process. Similar measures, called “Right to Try,” have passed in Arizona, Colorado, Louisiana, Michigan, and Missouri. Right to Try legislation would have benefited...

Taxes

South Carolina Governor Proposes Gas, Income Tax Deal

On January 21, South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley delivered her annual State of the State address. Announcing her 2015 agenda, she proposed reforming the state’s tax structure, cutting reducing the state’s income tax rate by 30 percent and increasing the state’s gas tax by $0.10 per gallon. Haley’s support for increasing the state’s gas tax was conditional on the legislature’s approval of a...

South Carolina Board Reverses Statewide Uber Ban

In late January, a South Carolina quasi-judicial regulatory board reversed its earlier statewide ban on Uber, one of several popular transportation network companies operating in the state. On January 15, the state’s Public Service Commission ordered the ridesharing company to cease and desist all business activity in the state. Two weeks later, on January 29, the board reversed its ban and...

Kasich Tax Plan Squeezes Ohio Businesses, Consumers

In March, Ohio Governor Kasich will officially unveil his supplemental budget plan and omnibus bill, outlining his legislative priorities for the next two years. Although previews of the plan include some positive reforms, the governor’s “mid-biennium review” also includes proposed higher taxes on Ohio businesses and consumers. To offset revenue losses from the income tax cut, Kasich plans to...

Tech

Study: Netflix More Valuable Than Cable, Broadcast Among Millennials

In an observation that should surprise no one except a few cave-dwellers, a new study from NATPE/Content First and the Consumer Electronics Association has found that millennials find Netflix subscriptions more valuable than broadcast and cable subscriptions. There are, however, some useful insights to be gleaned if we look a little deeper. The study found that “51 percent of...

A Question for 2015: Is the FCC Unlawful?

In May 2001, I published a law review article titled, “The Public Interest Standard: Is It Too Indeterminate to Be Constitutional?” In the article, I suggested that the ubiquitous public interest standard, invoked in support of so much of the Federal Communications Commission’s regulatory activity, is so lacking in any “intelligible principle” that the standard is unconstitutional. After all, in...