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‘Freedom Triumphant’ Defines Heartland’s 30th Anniversary Gala Featuring Joe Walsh and Michelle Malkin

Blog - Education - September 17, 2014, 2:42 PM

Michelle Malkin speaking at The Heartland Institute’s 30th Anniversary Benefit Dinner on Sept. 12, 2014.

“Freedom Triumphant” was the theme of The Heartland Institute’s 30th Anniversary Benefit Dinner on Friday, Sept. 12, at The Cotillion in Palatine, Illinois. Some 500 people were in attendance.

Most fitting is that the evening began with a video reminding those in attendance of some of the events in politics, popular culture, and freedom that took place in 1984 when Ronald Reagan was reelected in a landslide, the same year Bruce Springsteen’s “Born in the USA” album was released. The video ended with what has become a momentous event in history: the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989.

A featured keynote speaker was Michelle Malkin, a New York Times best-selling author, nationally syndicated columnist, wildly successful digital entrepreneur, and Tea Party champion. Malkin was joined at Heartland’s 30th Anniversary Gala by Master of Ceremonies, former congressman Joe Walsh, the greatest champion the Tea Party ever had in Washington, when representing the 8th District of Illinois from 2011 – 2013. Walsh’s enthusiasm for liberty is shared every weekday from 5 to 8 p.m. in Chicago on his radio talk show on AM 560 The Answer.

The recipient of the 2014 Heartland Liberty Prize was M. Stanton Evans, a founder of the modern conservative movement along with Bill Buckley. As a proponent of “fusionism,” Evans believed that a love of freedom should unite conservatives and libertarians regardless of their disagreements. Because of poor health Evans was unable to attend. In his absence, Joseph A. Morris and Jameson Campaigne presented the tribute to the honoree. Morris and Campaigne told of the gift of wit displayed by Evans, and of his perception of “liberty as an organized outgrowth of civilization.”

Heartland Institute President Joseph Bast set the tone for the evening. In talking about Heartland and its purpose since its inception its founding in 1984 by Dave Padden, Bast stressed how ideas do matter in the history of nations. Regarding freedom, “Freedom wants for defenders who often end up as martyrs.” Moreover, “defenders are outnumbered by their foes.”

Freedom is what The Heartland Institute is all about. With a full time staff of 29 (21 working in the Chicago office), there are approximately 235 academics and professional economists participating in the peer-review process and more than 160 elected officials who serve on its Legislative Forum. The Heartland Institute only rarely lobbies for or against pending legislation, but through Heartland’s government relations staff more than 1.2 million contacts with elected officials were made in 2013. Through this education process, Joe Bast credits Heartland for why there is no carbon tax or cap-and-trade program in the U.S.

Walsh, calling himself a Tea Party conservative, wasted no time, nor did he disappoint his audience, employing his usual enthusiasm and energy when he shouted: WE HAVE A COUNTRY TO SAVE! Admitting that he was just a “warmup act for one of the top warriors we have for freedom in this country,” Walsh also revealed that he had worked at Heartland years ago “at the knees of Joe and Diane Bast.”

Freedom was uppermost in Walsh’s thoughts when he asked a series of three questions, all of which were greeted with a resounding “yes”.

 1. Do you believe the federal government is too big?

2. Do you believe the state and local governments should have more power than the federal government?

3. Do you believe in the benefits of the free market system?

 In explaining what drives Walsh, why he gets so worked up, he said: “We’re losing it.” And he was talking about the country. Walsh takes on both Democrats and Republicans when legislators on either side choose to ignore the type of government our Founding Fathers bequeathed to us. When in Congress, Joe Walsh made lots of promises which he kept, a rarity among politicians. In promising a free and open government, Walsh held 334 town meetings open to the public, far exceeding any other legislator.

Using a dollar bill to address his point that no one can make the case that this is a free country, Walsh removed a dollar bill from his wallet.“When the government takes 40 cents of every dollar, and we no longer get to keep most of it,” he said, “we are no longer free.” When in Congress, most of the calls Walsh received were from small businessmen and -women who said they were done with Illinois.

Walsh’s relationship with House Speaker John Boehner wasn’t the greatest, he said. Boehner always addressed the congressman simply as “Walsh.” Once when Boehner was passing by Walsh’s desk, Boehner placed his hands on his shoulders asking him, “Why did you vote against my debt ceiling bill again?” To which Walsh replied, “I would never vote for anything that increased the size of government.”

Walsh said his role in life is to wake people up, and he implored the audience to make it their mission, too. But even if we start now, Walsh cautioned, we won’t be able to win back what this nation has lost during the course of our lifetime.

In introducing Malkin, Walsh spoke of her as “a hero to many patriot conservatives in Congress,” which, Walsh admitted, was a lonely place to be given his experience as a conservative and Tea Party Republican.

Malkin was greeted warmly and enthusiastically in keeping with her reputation and status as an undisputed hero of freedom. Recalling Walsh’s remark of what drives him, Malkin described her life as an open book, and said he she considered it a pleasure to help The Heartland Institute celebrate its 30th anniversary.

Malkin’s parents came to America from the Philippines in 1976 to pursue the American dream and to provide a better education for their two children. The rule of law was respected. A legal fee had to be paid and learning English was required. Accordingly, Malkin defines herself not as a hyphenated American but as simply an American. For over two decades Malkin has been a proud out-of-the-closet conservative. It was early on that she realized the need to fight back, understanding that freedom cannot be taken for granted. The Heartland Institute was summarily described by Michelle as an important think tank because it represents “a catalyst for action that encourages restoration, not transformation.”

Common Core was at the top of Malkin’s concerns, having two children of her own: a boy now 10, and a girl 14. “Not too many years ago eyes glazed over when Common Core was mentioned,” Malkin said. She went on to praise Heartland Institute Research Fellow Joy Pullmann, who was seated at the same table I was. Pullmann, Malkin said, is “a one-woman warrior against Common Core.” According to Malkin, whether called Common Core, No Child Left Behind, Outcome Ed, or Goals 2000, underlying all is “fed ed” – a way to obtain power and cash. All these programs make children into guinea pigs for the state.

Malkin described the teaching of math as an abomination, naming the University of Chicago Education Department as the center of many education fads. A Texas school board in 2007, she said, decided it would drop the way math was being taught when children were asked these questions on everyday math worksheets:

A. If math were a color, it would be ____, because ____,

B. If it were a food, it would be ____, because ____,

C. If it were weather, it would be ____, because ____.

Indicating that it’s not easy to be a squeaky wheel, Malkin related a situation she faced when her daughter was much younger. Malkin noticed that her daughter, when attending an all-girls school, was being taught the same thing over and over again, even when she advanced to the next grade. Malkin was told by her daughter’s teacher that this strategy was called spiraling, where leaning is spread out over time rather than being concentrated in shorter periods, a strategy devised by the University of Chicago Education Department. The teacher further informed Malkin that this strategy would help girls have more self esteem in math. To which she replied, “This is not a football game where strategy is important. It is math where getting the right answer is the important thing.”

The experience with her daughter prompted Malkin to write a column in 2007, “Everyday Math,” about the ineffectiveness of teaching math, where upon she was called into the office of her daughter’s principal. To Malkin’s surprise, with the principal was a legal counsel representative. Malkin was bluntly told that if she didn’t refrain from writing about the way math was being taught, her daughter would be kicked out of school.

Malkin stated that the common theme in educational policy is that of central planning and self-appointed experts who know better than we do. It is only the progressive Left that gets to decide who counts as an expert. If you are right-minded you are just a “blogger,” as Malkin said Fox News commentator Juan Williams once labeled her to dismiss her arguments in a debate. It is repulsive, Malkin said, that children are but cogs in the machine and some expert is deciding what their goals should be.

Malkin further expounded upon how radical leftist Bill Ayers, Barack Obama’s partner in education “reform” in the 1990s, traveled to Venezuela to praise the budding system of socialist education in that country. A further revelation by Ms. Malkin was how the National Education Association in 2009 made a glowing assessment of radical socialist community organizer Saul Alinksy, recommending that teachers read Alinsky’s 1971 book, “Rules for Radicals.”

Common Core is in keeping with the cradle-to-grave fantasy expressed in an Obama campaign via a propaganda slideshow called “The Life of Julia.” It was intended to illustrate how the Obama administration’s policies will give government help to a young woman as she is educated, works, starts a family and retires.

So many wealthy individuals and their foundations have been fooled by Common Core and are pushing it – Bill Gates and George Soros are two, but also on board are the National Chamber of Commerce, Jeb Bush, and Mike Huckabee. All should know better and must wake up! Fed ed (Common Core), by design, gives students a liberal interpretation of this nation’s history – stressing that America is bad and doesn’t deserve to be ranked above any other nation. Malkin warned that even if children are sent to a Christian school or home schooled, they may not be immune from Common Core.

Malkin is so thankful she can make a living in America by running off her mouth. This keeps her a happy warrior – even if, she said, “we are living in a culture of corruption.” Whether talking about Democrats or Republicans, like barnacles they become stuck to the side of the U.S. government, where they pander to people who want to destroy the American Dream.

In closing, Malkin recounted how she had had the opportunity to go to Iraq in 2007, traveling with a male colleague to cover the surge in Baghdad. This experience was a jarring one for her. Her final words: “We are so lucky and should not take for granted that we live in the greatest country on the planet. Now we must fight to preserve it. May God Bless America!”

‘Freedom Triumphant’ Defines Heartland’s 30th Anniversary Gala Featuring Joe Walsh and Michelle Malkin

Somewhat Reasonable - September 17, 2014, 2:42 PM

Michelle Malkin speaking at The Heartland Institute’s 30th Anniversary Benefit Dinner on Sept. 12, 2014.

“Freedom Triumphant” was the theme of The Heartland Institute’s 30th Anniversary Benefit Dinner on Friday, Sept. 12, at The Cotillion in Palatine, Illinois. Some 500 people were in attendance.

Most fitting is that the evening began with a video reminding those in attendance of some of the events in politics, popular culture, and freedom that took place in 1984 when Ronald Reagan was reelected in a landslide, the same year Bruce Springsteen’s “Born in the USA” album was released. The video ended with what has become a momentous event in history: the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989.

A featured keynote speaker was Michelle Malkin, a New York Times best-selling author, nationally syndicated columnist, wildly successful digital entrepreneur, and Tea Party champion. Malkin was joined at Heartland’s 30th Anniversary Gala by Master of Ceremonies, former congressman Joe Walsh, the greatest champion the Tea Party ever had in Washington, when representing the 8th District of Illinois from 2011 – 2013. Walsh’s enthusiasm for liberty is shared every weekday from 5 to 8 p.m. in Chicago on his radio talk show on AM 560 The Answer.

The recipient of the 2014 Heartland Liberty Prize was M. Stanton Evans, a founder of the modern conservative movement along with Bill Buckley. As a proponent of “fusionism,” Evans believed that a love of freedom should unite conservatives and libertarians regardless of their disagreements. Because of poor health Evans was unable to attend. In his absence, Joseph A. Morris and Jameson Campaigne presented the tribute to the honoree. Morris and Campaigne told of the gift of wit displayed by Evans, and of his perception of “liberty as an organized outgrowth of civilization.”

Heartland Institute President Joseph Bast set the tone for the evening. In talking about Heartland and its purpose since its inception its founding in 1984 by Dave Padden, Bast stressed how ideas do matter in the history of nations. Regarding freedom, “Freedom wants for defenders who often end up as martyrs.” Moreover, “defenders are outnumbered by their foes.”

Freedom is what The Heartland Institute is all about. With a full time staff of 29 (21 working in the Chicago office), there are approximately 235 academics and professional economists participating in the peer-review process and more than 160 elected officials who serve on its Legislative Forum. The Heartland Institute only rarely lobbies for or against pending legislation, but through Heartland’s government relations staff more than 1.2 million contacts with elected officials were made in 2013. Through this education process, Joe Bast credits Heartland for why there is no carbon tax or cap-and-trade program in the U.S.

Walsh, calling himself a Tea Party conservative, wasted no time, nor did he disappoint his audience, employing his usual enthusiasm and energy when he shouted: WE HAVE A COUNTRY TO SAVE! Admitting that he was just a “warmup act for one of the top warriors we have for freedom in this country,” Walsh also revealed that he had worked at Heartland years ago “at the knees of Joe and Diane Bast.”

Freedom was uppermost in Walsh’s thoughts when he asked a series of three questions, all of which were greeted with a resounding “yes”.

 1. Do you believe the federal government is too big?

2. Do you believe the state and local governments should have more power than the federal government?

3. Do you believe in the benefits of the free market system?

 In explaining what drives Walsh, why he gets so worked up, he said: “We’re losing it.” And he was talking about the country. Walsh takes on both Democrats and Republicans when legislators on either side choose to ignore the type of government our Founding Fathers bequeathed to us. When in Congress, Joe Walsh made lots of promises which he kept, a rarity among politicians. In promising a free and open government, Walsh held 334 town meetings open to the public, far exceeding any other legislator.

Using a dollar bill to address his point that no one can make the case that this is a free country, Walsh removed a dollar bill from his wallet.“When the government takes 40 cents of every dollar, and we no longer get to keep most of it,” he said, “we are no longer free.” When in Congress, most of the calls Walsh received were from small businessmen and -women who said they were done with Illinois.

Walsh’s relationship with House Speaker John Boehner wasn’t the greatest, he said. Boehner always addressed the congressman simply as “Walsh.” Once when Boehner was passing by Walsh’s desk, Boehner placed his hands on his shoulders asking him, “Why did you vote against my debt ceiling bill again?” To which Walsh replied, “I would never vote for anything that increased the size of government.”

Walsh said his role in life is to wake people up, and he implored the audience to make it their mission, too. But even if we start now, Walsh cautioned, we won’t be able to win back what this nation has lost during the course of our lifetime.

In introducing Malkin, Walsh spoke of her as “a hero to many patriot conservatives in Congress,” which, Walsh admitted, was a lonely place to be given his experience as a conservative and Tea Party Republican.

Malkin was greeted warmly and enthusiastically in keeping with her reputation and status as an undisputed hero of freedom. Recalling Walsh’s remark of what drives him, Malkin described her life as an open book, and said he she considered it a pleasure to help The Heartland Institute celebrate its 30th anniversary.

Malkin’s parents came to America from the Philippines in 1976 to pursue the American dream and to provide a better education for their two children. The rule of law was respected. A legal fee had to be paid and learning English was required. Accordingly, Malkin defines herself not as a hyphenated American but as simply an American. For over two decades Malkin has been a proud out-of-the-closet conservative. It was early on that she realized the need to fight back, understanding that freedom cannot be taken for granted. The Heartland Institute was summarily described by Michelle as an important think tank because it represents “a catalyst for action that encourages restoration, not transformation.”

Common Core was at the top of Malkin’s concerns, having two children of her own: a boy now 10, and a girl 14. “Not too many years ago eyes glazed over when Common Core was mentioned,” Malkin said. She went on to praise Heartland Institute Research Fellow Joy Pullmann, who was seated at the same table I was. Pullmann, Malkin said, is “a one-woman warrior against Common Core.” According to Malkin, whether called Common Core, No Child Left Behind, Outcome Ed, or Goals 2000, underlying all is “fed ed” – a way to obtain power and cash. All these programs make children into guinea pigs for the state.

Malkin described the teaching of math as an abomination, naming the University of Chicago Education Department as the center of many education fads. A Texas school board in 2007, she said, decided it would drop the way math was being taught when children were asked these questions on everyday math worksheets:

A. If math were a color, it would be ____, because ____,

B. If it were a food, it would be ____, because ____,

C. If it were weather, it would be ____, because ____.

Indicating that it’s not easy to be a squeaky wheel, Malkin related a situation she faced when her daughter was much younger. Malkin noticed that her daughter, when attending an all-girls school, was being taught the same thing over and over again, even when she advanced to the next grade. Malkin was told by her daughter’s teacher that this strategy was called spiraling, where leaning is spread out over time rather than being concentrated in shorter periods, a strategy devised by the University of Chicago Education Department. The teacher further informed Malkin that this strategy would help girls have more self esteem in math. To which she replied, “This is not a football game where strategy is important. It is math where getting the right answer is the important thing.”

The experience with her daughter prompted Malkin to write a column in 2007, “Everyday Math,” about the ineffectiveness of teaching math, where upon she was called into the office of her daughter’s principal. To Malkin’s surprise, with the principal was a legal counsel representative. Malkin was bluntly told that if she didn’t refrain from writing about the way math was being taught, her daughter would be kicked out of school.

Malkin stated that the common theme in educational policy is that of central planning and self-appointed experts who know better than we do. It is only the progressive Left that gets to decide who counts as an expert. If you are right-minded you are just a “blogger,” as Malkin said Fox News commentator Juan Williams once labeled her to dismiss her arguments in a debate. It is repulsive, Malkin said, that children are but cogs in the machine and some expert is deciding what their goals should be.

Malkin further expounded upon how radical leftist Bill Ayers, Barack Obama’s partner in education “reform” in the 1990s, traveled to Venezuela to praise the budding system of socialist education in that country. A further revelation by Ms. Malkin was how the National Education Association in 2009 made a glowing assessment of radical socialist community organizer Saul Alinksy, recommending that teachers read Alinsky’s 1971 book, “Rules for Radicals.”

Common Core is in keeping with the cradle-to-grave fantasy expressed in an Obama campaign via a propaganda slideshow called “The Life of Julia.” It was intended to illustrate how the Obama administration’s policies will give government help to a young woman as she is educated, works, starts a family and retires.

So many wealthy individuals and their foundations have been fooled by Common Core and are pushing it – Bill Gates and George Soros are two, but also on board are the National Chamber of Commerce, Jeb Bush, and Mike Huckabee. All should know better and must wake up! Fed ed (Common Core), by design, gives students a liberal interpretation of this nation’s history – stressing that America is bad and doesn’t deserve to be ranked above any other nation. Malkin warned that even if children are sent to a Christian school or home schooled, they may not be immune from Common Core.

Malkin is so thankful she can make a living in America by running off her mouth. This keeps her a happy warrior – even if, she said, “we are living in a culture of corruption.” Whether talking about Democrats or Republicans, like barnacles they become stuck to the side of the U.S. government, where they pander to people who want to destroy the American Dream.

In closing, Malkin recounted how she had had the opportunity to go to Iraq in 2007, traveling with a male colleague to cover the surge in Baghdad. This experience was a jarring one for her. Her final words: “We are so lucky and should not take for granted that we live in the greatest country on the planet. Now we must fight to preserve it. May God Bless America!”

Categories: On the Blog

Why Might There Be No 15th Dalai Lama? Pure Politics

Somewhat Reasonable - September 17, 2014, 10:00 AM

Last week the Dalai Lama, the religious leader of the Tibetan people, announced that he might not reincarnate, a suggestion that has sparked a flurry of commentary and speculation about the future of the Tibetan independence movement.

All of this controversy over whether the Dalai Lama will or won’t reincarnate may seem surprising, given the dubious premise that reincarnation is a genuine possibility for any human being, however enlightened, to achieve. Yet it is a decision that will help shape the future of the Tibetan people for years to come.

According to Tibetan Buddhist theology, Tenzin Gyatso, the 14th and current Dalai Lama, is the living incarnation of the Buddha of Compassion. As a Buddha, or enlightened being, the Dalai Lama is meant to have the power to reincarnate with full memory of his past lives in order to provide guidance to other seekers after enlightenment. He is technically free of the perpetual cycle of death and rebirth in which ordinary people are trapped, but he chooses to stay as a teacher rather than ascend permanently to a higher plane of existence.

When the Dalai Lama dies, senior figures within Tibetan Buddhism begin to search for his next incarnation. This process usually takes several years. When prospective candidates are discovered, they are tested with questions that, supposedly, only the Dalai Lama could answer. When a child passes the test, he is inducted into the priesthood and begins a lengthy term of study before being enthroned as the next spiritual leader of Tibet.

As a Buddha, the Dalai Lama can (according to Tibetan beliefs) decide at any time not to be reborn. It is that loophole the Dalai Lama is now seeking to exploit. It is something he has been making room to do for some time. In 2011 the Dalai Lama ceded all political power to an elected leader, ending the theocratic system of government that predominated in Tibet and in the government-in-exile since the Chinese invasion.

Why might there be no 15th Dalai Lama? The move is pure politics. The Dalai Lama rightly fears that the Chinese government will try to exploit the situation in the wake of his death, “discovering” their own candidate for Dalai Lama who will be firmly under the thumb of Beijing. This has happened with other senior lamas, with the exiled Tibetans recognizing a candidate and monks under the authority of Beijing choosing another. The Dalai Lama seems to have surmised that such a split over his own replacement could prove disastrous for the cause of Tibetan rights. By choosing to have no successor, he may be able to prevent China from undermining the future of the Tibetan independence movement.

The Tibetan people remain oppressed. They are denied true religious freedom and are economically exploited by the Han Chinese majority. The Dalai Lama has been instrumental in highlighting the continued abuses and has been a powerful spokesman for the rights of his countrymen and all oppressed people.

China clearly sees the Dalai Lama’s statement as a threat to their plans. The Chinese government responded to the Dalai Lama’s statement by urging him to “respect reincarnation.” That is a truly bizarre statement coming from a government that allegedly promotes an ideology of communistic materialism that is diametrically opposed to religion, faith, and the supernatural. Their dissatisfaction with the Dalai Lama’s suggestion has tipped their hand that they will not respect the process should it be allowed to proceed. Indeed, their attitude may only make the Dalai Lama’s decision not to have a successor easier for him.

Whether there is a 15th Dalai Lama or not, Tibet faces many challenges. The growth of the Chinese economy and Beijing’s increasing willingness to flex its political muscles abroad do not bode well for the future of Tibet as a nation or as a partially self-governing subject of China. The Dalai Lama may see not reincarnating as a final gift to his people for whom he has so longed striven.

[Originally published at IOnTheScene]

Categories: On the Blog

‘Most Transparent Ever?’ Behold the FCC’s Secret, Crony Socialist Meetings

Somewhat Reasonable - September 16, 2014, 9:26 AM

It is yet another Barack Obama Administration pledge now relegated to the ash heap of Mendacious History.

The Most Transparent Administration In History

The Most Transparent Administration in History

This is the Most Transparent Administration in History

This is the Most Transparent Administration in the History of our Country

We’re the Most Transparent and Ethical Administration in U.S. History

Get the trance-inducing mantra? And Administration members have continued to relentlessly chant it – even though it long ago became a patently absurd assertion.

Despite Boasts, Obama Team Shuns Transparency

Oh the Transparency: Obama Administration Officials Meet Lobbyists at Coffee Shop to Evade Disclosure Laws

‘Transparent’ Obama Cracks Down on Whistleblowers

The Obama Administration’s Transparency Website Fails to Report $619 Billion in Federal Spending

Senators Call On Obama For More Transparency in the Intelligence Community

Why Is Obama Only Transparent with Enemies?

So now that we are deep into the Administration’s fifth year, is this at all surprising?

(Federal Communications Commission) FCC Encourages Media Companies to Provide Confidential Complaints on (Comcast’s) Time Warner Cable Purchase

Sounds totally transparent to me.

This ain’t about Comcast’s purchase of Time Warner. It’s about the Obama Administration’s yet again squid ink-like “transparency.”

The FCC reviewing mergers isn’t duplicative – it’s triplicative. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and the Justice Department also conduct reviews. Any one of the three different arms of the Leviathan can unilaterally block.

However, unlike prospective denials by the FTC and Justice – the FCC’s can not be challenged in court. They say Nay – and it’s all over.

And the FCC has the most nebulous of review standards – does the merger serve the “public interest?”  The FCC their own selves get to define “public interest” on a rolling, a la carte basis. They simply proclaim something is not in the “public interest” – and that’s all she wrote.

Given how murky their standard is – their process should absolutely be crystal clear. Holding secret meetings? Not so crystalline.

Are secret meetings FCC business as usual? Ummm, no.

In my decades-long experience with FCC matters, it is fairly unusual, if not unprecedented, for the FCC to take the initiative in encouraging confidential complaints in the context of an on-the-record merger review proceeding.

Sounds totally transparent to me.

Again – it ain’t (just) about the merger. The FCC has pending before it several huge power grabs of its own taking. Including unilaterally imposing Network Neutrality – and even Title II Reclassification to do it.

And the companies getting Crony Socialist secret meetings – who are opposed to the merger – are in favor of the Title II-Net Neutrality power grab. Because it would allow them to use unlimited bandwidth without having to pay for it.

Will Title II Reclassification and/or Net Neutrality also be discussed? Will any other FCC pending actions? Will any new FCC actions be requested? We won’t know – the meetings are secret.

Meanwhile, the FCC has remained neutral throughout all these power grab processes, right? Not so much.

If you’re participating in #InternetSlowdown pls consider filing your comment via openinternet@FCC.gov. It’s faster & each will be counted

— Gigi Sohn (@GigiBSohnFCC) September 10, 2014

Who is Gigi Sohn? She is FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler’s “Special Counsel for External Affairs.” “External Affairs” apparently includes requesting more pro-Title II Reclassification power grab Comments – and supporting the absurd “Internet Slowdown” Title II protest. Not so neutral.

Who was Gigi Sohn? She was since 2001 the President and CEO of Public Knowledge. A Media Marxist outfit that is pro-Title II Reclassification and supportive of the absurd “Internet Slowdown” protest. And where is Public Knowledge on the merger? Opposed, natch.

Not a whole lot of neutral going on.

So the FCC is telegraphing its desire to Title II power grab the entire Internet – while still receiving Comments they claim will help them make up their mind.

And have before them a merger they are allegedly neutrally reviewing – while offering up secret meetings with its opponents.

Yet another ongoing, fabulous example of Obama Administration transparency.

[Originally published at RedState]

Categories: On the Blog

The Business of Business is Business

Somewhat Reasonable - September 15, 2014, 4:00 PM

While captains of industry are seldom poetic, they have occasionally produced profound statements on the subject of their trade. My favorite is Calvin Coolidge’s aphorism, “the man who builds a factory builds a temple”. More than just a beautiful statement of reverence for commerce, it sums up a wonderfully American attitude toward the proper application of business.

Indeed, the business of business is business. But that does not mean a business should unconcerned with outcomes or the world around it. It is evident that business concerns form an integral part of every aspect of human interaction.

And there is almost invariably more than a mere material desire involved in the building of a business. Each time a new business is created it is a laying of foundations for a new temple. While they may not be gilded in the splendor of the titans of Wall Street, they share the same demiurgic significance, the effort to leave a permanent mark upon the world, not through force or imposition of will, but through the creation of a productive enterprise. The conduct of honest business represents the ultimate triumph of human reason and dignity over the barbarism of animal instinct. It demonstrates a respect between individuals, and an adherence to a higher order of justice than that of the sword.

Still, business, particularly big business, is accused of abuses of good faith and of promoting conflict. Activists recount the evils of business, citing examples like Enron and British Petroleum as abusers of privileged positions and of the public trust. The role of business in society is to do business, to provide productive development. The risk is when business is subverted to violence, be it political, economic, or physical. That is not business doing business; that is the adoption of the methods of force and coercion that free commerce decries.

There is a need to reflect on the special place of businessmen. After all, all businessmen are also citizens with the attendant responsibilities of citizenship. There is a need to differentiate between the responsibilities and values of businessmen in their jobs and those of businessmen to society. In truth, business performs its greatest boon to society by going about its own business, contributing both material value and a valuable example of the power of peaceful interaction.

This does not excuse citizens who are also businessmen from their responsibilities. In fact, they must be all the more aware of their competing responsibilities.

Categories: On the Blog

The EPA is More Concerned with What Sounds Good Than What Actually Works

Somewhat Reasonable - September 15, 2014, 3:55 PM

In this hyper-partisan environment, it is good to know that a majority of Senators can still agree on an issue. When such a rare moment happens, the rest of us should pay attention, as it is probably something very important.

On September 11, 53 Senators (43 Republicans and 10 Democrats) signed a letter to Gina McCarthy, Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), begging for a 60-day extension of the comment period for the “Carbon Pollution Emission Guidelines for Existing Stationary Sources: Electric Generating Units”—also known as the Clean Power Plan (CPP). The original 120-day comment period—which is already longer than the traditional 60-day comment period—is coming to a close within the next 30 days (October 16).

Regarding the EPA’s new plan, the letter calls the coordination needed between multiple state agencies, public utility commissions, regional transmission organizations, and transmission and reliability experts: “Unprecedented, extraordinary, and extremely time consuming.” The Senators ask for more time so that states and stakeholders can “fully analyze and assess the sweeping impacts that the proposal will have on our nation’s energy system.” It also points out: “The EPA proposal provides no mechanism for adjusting the state emission rate targets once they are adopted”—which makes it imperative that the states can fully “digest” the rule, review the 600 supporting documents, and collect the data and justification for the states’ responses.

It is not just the majority of Senators who have concerns about the EPA’s proposed rule, a diverse and growing coalition, including the Exotic Wildlife Association, the Foundry Association of Michigan, California Cotton Growers Association, Texas Aggregates and Concrete Association, The Fertilizer Institute, Georgia Railroad Association, Nebraska Farm Bureau Federation, electric utilities and co-ops, and city and state Chambers of Commerce from coast-to-coast, has sprung up in opposition to the plan. Yet most people are unaware of the potential impacts or of the pending deadline for public comment.

I have written on the CPP twice in the past few months—originally when it was first announced onJune 2 and then after I gave testimony in Atlanta at one of the EPA’s four scheduled “listening sessions.” Upon release, we didn’t really know much—after all, it is, as the Senators’ letter explains, complex and sweeping. But as more and more information is coming out, we see that the impact to the economy and U.S. energy security will be devastating.

Despite my efforts to spread the word—with my second column on the topic being one of my most popular ever, I find that the CPP isn’t even on the radar of the politically engaged (let alone the average person). Because this is an issue of utmost importance, I am, once again, bringing it to the attention of my readers with the hope that you will share it with everyone you know. At this point, we don’t know if the EPA will extend the comment period, so please take time now to get your comments in. The Hillreports: “Adding 60 days to the comment period could make it harder for the EPA to finalize the rule by June 2015, as President Obama has ordered.”

I’ve written this week’s column with the specific intent of giving you verbiage that you can simply cut and paste into the comment form.

The CPP will radically alter the way electricity is generated, transmitted, distributed and used in America—all with dramatic cost impacts to the consumer. It is based on the discredited theory that climate change is a crisis caused by the use of fossil fuels emitting carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. It aims to reduce overall carbon dioxide emissions by 30 percent below 2005 levels by 2030. The combination of the CPP and previous regulation will shut down more than 40 percent of coal-fueled generation—representing 10 percent of all electricity-generation capacity—within the next 6 years.

What will this forced, premature elimination of America’s electric capacity do?

The proposed EPA plan will seriously threaten America’s electric reliability

Unless the EPA backs down on its harsh regulations and coal-fueled power plants get a reprieve, blackouts are almost guaranteed—especially in light of the projected cold winter. About the 2014 “polar vortex” that crippled the U.S., Alaska Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski, at an April Senate hearing on grid reliability, stated: “Eighty-nine percent of the coal electricity capacity that is due to go offline was utilized as that backup to meet the demand this winter.” Murkowski’s comments were referencing coal-fueled power plants that are already due to be shut down based on regulations from five years ago, before the proposed CPP additionally reduces supply. Affirming Murkowski’s comments, Nicholas Akins, president and CEO of Ohio-based American Electric Power Company Inc., sees the 2014 near crisis as a warning sign. At that same hearing he said: “The weather events experienced this winter provided an early warning about serious issues with electric supply and reliability. This country did not just dodge a bullet—we dodged a cannonball.” And, Federal Energy Regulatory Commissioner Philip Moeller said: “the country is undergoing an unprecedented energy shift in a very short time frame.” And added: “grid operators in the Midwest are struggling to gauge whether they will have sufficient capacity to handle peak weather during the next five years.” While these comments are about the 2014 severe cold, Texas experienced a similar scare in 2011, when a protracted heat wave resulted in razor-thin reserve electric capacity margins. A Reuters report titled: “Heat waves pushes Texas power grid into red zone,” stated: “Texas has the most wind power in the country, but the wind does not blow during the summer.” Just a few months earlier, Texas ice storms forced rolling blackouts for hours because electric supplies dropped below demand.” All of these reports are before the projected closure of an additional 75 megawatts of coal-fueled electricity generation due to the new regulations. If McCarthy was serious when, prior to the release of the proposed regulations, she stated: “Nothing we do can threaten reliability,” she’d withdraw this plan, as it will do just that.

The proposed EPA plan will chase away more American industry

While the CPP appears to be about forcing the power sector into reducing carbon-dioxide emissions, there are spillover impacts of higher electricity rates on overall economic activity—especially energy-intensive industries such as steel, manufacturing, and chemicals. America’s abundance of affordable, reliable energy provides businesses with a critical operating advantage in today’s intensely competitive global economy. The EPA’s proposal will reduce America’s advantage, as it’s acknowledged that the proposed regulations will raise electricity rates in the contiguous U.S. by 5.9% to 6.5% in 2020. Europe, and especially Germany, is threatened by an industry exodus due to its higher energy costs that have been created by its move to increase green energy. Germany’s pharmaceutical and chemical giant Bayer is already making significant investment in its Chinese manufacturing operations, with expansion also taking place in Brazil and India. If industry continues to leave the U.S., the CPP will have the opposite effect. Emissions will increase as companies move to countries with lower labor costs, cheaper energy, and lax environmental policies. An additional unintended consequence will be more jobs lost in manufacturing.

The proposed EPA plan will kill hundreds of thousands of jobs

In late July, the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) International President Edwin D. Hill said: “If these rules are implemented as written, dozens of coal plants will shut down and with no plans to replace them, tens of thousands of jobs will be lost and global carbon emissions will rise anyway.” Investor’s Business Daily reports: “The IBEW has now joined the United Mine Workers of America, the Boilermakers and several other unions opposed to the new anti-carbon rules.” The United Mine Workers of America has estimated that the rule will result in 187,000 direct and indirect job losses in the utility, rail, and coal industries in 2020 and cumulative wage and benefit losses from these sectors of $208 billion between 2015 and 2035. The EPA rules hitting industry in rapid succession createuncertainty—and, as we’ve seen with Obamacare—uncertainty thwarts investment and hiring. The same industries that will be taking the regulatory hit from the CPP, are expecting additional impacts from the follow-on rules that are yet to be promulgated. No wonder the economy is sluggish and the jobs picture is bleak.

The proposed EPA plan will cause harsh economic consequences while having virtually no impact on the reported goal of stopping global climate change

From increased energy costs to job losses, the CPP will damage the economy. A statement from the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers on the EPA proposal, points out: “estimates regarding the damage to jobs and the economy created by poorly planned climate regulations have consistently been shown to be true in comparison to the overly optimistic predictions made by the EPA.” Perhaps these economic consequences would be worth it, if they actually did anything to really reduce carbon-dioxide emissions—assuming what humans breathe out and plants breathe in is actually the cause of global warming. But even the EPA acknowledges that the CPP is less about reductions and more about being a global leader to “prompt and leverage international decisions and action.” In Hillary Clinton’s September 4 speech at Senator Harry Reid’s National Clean Energy Summit, she stated that the U.S. needs to lead other countries in green energy and that we need to show the world we are committed. Yet, the U.S., which did not ratify the Kyoto Protocol, is the first country to actually reduce carbon dioxide emissions and meet the Kyoto requirements. We are already a leader, but the other countries aren’t following—instead they are abandoning the sinking green ship and Germany, which claims to still be committed to the green ideology, is actually increasing its number of coal-fueled power plants and CO2 emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions from non-Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries—such as China and India—are projected to grow by nine billion tons per year. The Partnership for a Better Energy Future reports: “for every ton of CO2 reduced in 2030 as a result of EPA’s rule, the rest of the world will have increased emissions by more than 16 tons.” Our reduction in 2030 would offset the equivalent of just 13.5 days of carbon-dioxide emissions from China. The CPP will become the definition of “all pain and no gain.” Or, as economist Thomas Sowell calls it: “replacing what worked with what sounded good.”

The EPA’s October 16 deadline will be upon us before you know it. Take a few minutes now to send them your comments. Pick any of the above suggestions, customize them as you please, and send them on to the EPA. For America to grow, we need energy that is effective, efficient, and economical, rather than that which is threatened by the EPA’s flood of excessive and burdensome regulations.

Categories: On the Blog

Decompetition Decompetition Decompetition

Somewhat Reasonable - September 15, 2014, 3:47 PM

The FCC’s new professed mantra is “competition competition competition.”

However, the FCC appears to be pursuing a de facto policy of decompetition rather than competition.

Decompetition is regulation that undermines competition in order to justify more regulation.

How could this perverse outcome happen?

It’s what one gets when one combines an obsolete communications law and regulators nostalgic for the regulatory power of a bygone era.

The FCC is increasingly acting like a 20th century regulator searching for relevance in a 21st century marketplace.

The 1934 Communications Act created the FCC. The 1996 Telecom Act changed national communications policy from monopoly utility regulation to competition policy.

Communications competition policy has been wildly successful in the U.S., resulting in the most robust facilities-based broadband competition in the world and $1.2 trillion in private Internet infrastructure investment.

Earlier this year, an appeals court ruled that the FCC did not have the authority to regulate broadband “information services” like a monopoly, common-carrier utility. However the court did recognize that the FCC does have some general regulatory authority under Section 706 of the 1996 Telecom Act to promote advanced telecommunications capability.

Ironically, for many years the FCC legally assumed that this same Section 706 provision did not confer the regulatory authority that they have now been granted by the appeals court.

The perverse problem with the FCC’s current complete dependency on the 1996 Telecom Act’s Section 706 provision for its broadband authority is that it now always must find broadband deployment and competition insufficient in order for the authority to remain usable by the FCC to regulate.

The FCC now needs competition to fail for the FCC to succeed.

This outcome also directly contravenes Congress’ stated purpose of the 1996 Act: “To promote competition and reduce regulation in order to secure lower prices and higher quality services for American telecommunications consumers and encourage the rapid deployment of new telecommunications technologies.”

Consider the evidence of this perverse outcome.

To effectively extend its regulatory authority for years, the FCC is proposing to redefine broadband from a baseline speed threshold of 4 Mbps to 10 Mbps and potentially as much as 25 Mbps, which would have the result of ruling that there is dramatically less broadband competition than today, simply by deeming it so by unilaterally “moving the goalpost.”

This is the regulatory equivalent of changing the rules of a football game so that after competitors have marched 97 yards down the field quickly without any penalties, the referee mid-game moves the goal-line 150 yards further, or even potentially 525 yards further, before the referee may rule it a touchdown.

The FCC also has signaled that as competition referee it will not recognize America’s four national LTE wireless broadband providers — Verizon, AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile — as real broadband competitors, because the FCC believes wireless broadband is not a “full substitute” to fixed broadband service.

To reach this self-serving and almost comical conclusion, the FCC has to ignore how 200 million Americans routinely use smartphones and tablets on the move to do essentially most every function that they can do on their fixed broadband at home.

This is the regulatory equivalent of the FCC referee of a football game arbitrarily ruling mid-game that the team that has fielded a smaller more mobile team doesn’t belong on the field competing with a larger less mobile team — even when 200 million consumer fans have long paid to watch this game.

What a perverse definition of competition when the FCC expects competitors to field the exact same type of players and strategy as their opponents. Isn’t the essence of being a competitor finding a different way, strategy or team with which to compete?

The FCC may be professing a mantra of “competition, competition, competition,” but their signaled decisions suggest a de facto FCC policy of “decompetition, decompetition, decompetition” — regulation that undermines competition in order to justify more regulation.

The best evidence that the Communications Act is obsolete, and in urgent need of modernization, is that the FCC has lost sight of Congress’ competition purpose in the 1996 Telecom Act — “to promote competition and reduce regulation” — and effectively reversed it to promote regulation and reduce competition.

American consumers deserve a competition policy aligned with their interests, not the FCC’s.

[Originally published at DailyCaller]

Categories: On the Blog

America’s Accessible Cities

Somewhat Reasonable - September 12, 2014, 12:03 PM

Cities have been pivotal role to improved living standards, because of the opportunities they facilitate. This is particularly evident over the past two centuries, as world urbanization has risen from 3 percent to over 50 percent, and to more than 80 percent in the United States.

The prosperity of urban residents depends in large measure on their ability to reach the best available jobs in the city in a reasonable period of time. This requires access. University of Paris economists Remy Prud’homme and Chang Woon Lee and othershave shown that cities tend to perform better economically if the transport system permits more jobs to be reached in a fixed time, such as 30 minutes. Cities are defined as metropolitan areas, which include core municipalities and suburbs. As former World Bank planner Alain Bertaud has indicated, “large labor markets are the raison d’être of large cities.”

With frequent press attention on traffic congestion and “gridlock,” it may be surprising that work trip travel times in US cities are better than those of high income competitors in other nations (See Table). Indeed, the University of Minnesota’s David Levinson, found that the typical employee can reach two-thirds of jobs in major US metropolitan areas within 30 minutes.

Census Bureau data indicates that the average work trip travel time in US cities of more than 5 million population was approximately 29 minutes each way. Western European cities of more than 5 million population have an average travel time of 32 minutes. Toronto, Canada’s only city of this size, has a travel time of 33 minutes. East Asian cities with more than 5 million residents (Tokyo, Osaka-Kobe-Kyoto, Nagoya, Seoul, Hong Kong and Singapore) have far longer average travel times — at 42 minutes. Australia’s two largest cities (Sydney and Melbourne), which are yet to reach 5 million, have an average travel times of 35 minutes.

A number of examples can be cited. For all its well known traffic congestion, Los Angeles has the shortest travel time of any high income world megacity (cities over 10 million population), at just 27 minutes. Paris and New York are the strongest competitors, at 34 minutes, while Tokyo’s 50 minutes is nearly double that of Los Angeles (estimated from travel time distributions reported by the Japan Statistics Bureau).

Dallas-Fort Worth is the best performing US city between 5 million and 10 million population, at 26 minutes. Travel time in Houston, Miami and Philadelphia is almost as short, at 27 minutes. Only the Germany’s Ruhr Valley (Essen-Duisburg-Dortmund) does better than these cities, at 24 minutes. Hong Kong’s travel time is the longest in this population category, at 46 minutes. This may be surprising, since in many ways Hong Kong conforms to current urban planning ideals. It is the densest urban area in the high income world and the largest transit work trip market share.

The US travel time advantage extends to metropolitan areas with more than 1,000,000 population. The average work trip travel time was 25 minutes in the US, compared to 27 minutes in Western Europe and 28 minutes in Canada. No data was found for the smaller metropolitan areas of East Asia or Australia.

Why are US cities so accessible? Despite the hostility of planners toward the automobile, the secret lies in automobile access. Generally, automobiles are faster than other modes, such as transit, walking and cycling for trips of the lengths required in modern metropolitan areas. The US also has more dispersed (decentralized) employment, which increases access and shortens travel times. Only 8 percent of major metropolitan area employment is in the downtown areas (central business districts) in US cities. Similar factors account for the Ruhr Valley’s quick travel times in Germany, with unusual employment dispersion and comprehensive freeway coverage (for Europe).

By contrast, nearly half the population and half of the jobs are in pre-1980 suburban areas (not the urban core), according to my analysis of zip code data. This makes more employment closer to people throughout the metropolitan area, on generally less congested roads.

Meanwhile, cars are getting cleaner. The Department of Energy forecasts the new US (and Canadian) fuel economy standards will reduce gross greenhouse gas emissions a quarter by 2040, despite a strong increase in driving and a conservative assumption of no progress in new car emissions after 2025. Yet things are likely to get much better, with groundbreaking advances by manufacturers, automated vehicle developers and government agencies. The California Air Resources Board is aiming for a statewide fleet that emits zero emissions by 2050, on the way to 100 percent.

Superior access is one reason that US cities dominate international income rankings. Access to greater employment choices is good for metropolitan economies. The result is a higher standard of living and less poverty than would otherwise be the case.

 

[Originally published at Huffington Post]

Categories: On the Blog

Global Warming Was Worth It

Environment Suite - In The News - September 11, 2014, 9:27 AM
Is progress a good thing? Generally speaking, it seems like an easy question – unless, that is, you’re in the “sustainability movement.” In a piece in the…

Global Warming Was Worth It

Stuff We Wish We Wrote - Homepage - September 11, 2014, 9:27 AM
Is progress a good thing? Generally speaking, it seems like an easy question – unless, that is, you’re in the “sustainability movement.” In a piece in the…

Super Scientist Neil deGrasse Tyson Doesn't Understand Statistics

Stuff We Wish We Wrote - Homepage - September 11, 2014, 9:22 AM
Neil deGrasse Tyson is super smart. Super duper smart. Super duper scientist smart. So smart, that this is what Google auto-fill suggests when you search for…

Never Forget 9/11: The Enemies of Liberty are Deadly Serious

Somewhat Reasonable - September 11, 2014, 7:46 AM

It is sobering to think that most high school kids today have no living memory of the 9/11 attacks. Even if they are seniors this year, those kids were only about 4- or 5-years old — an age when the memories they will keep are few and fleeting.

Every reader of this blog remembers where they were and what they were doing on that terrible morning — a day that started so crisp and happy after a long hot summer on the East Coast, where I was living at the time.

What is important to remember and teach to those children — especially these days, due to the rise of ISIS — is that 9/11 was not a “tragedy.” It was an act of war by barbarians armed with modern technology and determined to strike a blow against what the West had built since the Enlightenment — a society that protects the liberty of an individual human being to live his or her own life in the way they desire.

I had not thought of this before writing this post, but imagine a world in 2001 in which the Cold War was still raging. Imagine a world in which Soviet Communism was on equal global footing with the United States. Would Osama bin Laden have directed his soldiers to fly planes into the Kremlin? The question answers itself.

The aim of al-Qaida — and it’s latest manifestation, ISIS — was and remains subjugation. Legions of increasingly well-armed and sophisticated Islamofascists still consider it a religious mandate to destroy liberty. They will happily and violently sacrifice their lives to force the sons and daughters of the Enlightenment to surrender to their 7th-century version of Islam or die, which they see as the will of Allah. We will be fighting these barbarians for generations. And a long view of history teaches us that the forces of goodness and light do not always prevail.

It matters not your position on the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. It matters not your position on whether Gitmo should be closed. It doesn’t even matter whether your political hero is Ron Paul or Barack Obama. What matters is that the West never forgets what it is the enemies of liberty are willing to do to defeat liberty — and that we do everything we can to preserve it. The alternative is too miserable to contemplate.

Categories: On the Blog

Islam Relevant to Obama … But Only When it Comes to Real Threats, Like Global Warming

Somewhat Reasonable - September 10, 2014, 11:48 PM

President Obama on Wednesday night — the eve of the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks — said Islamic religious instruction is wholly irrelevant to the cause of ISIS … which stands for the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. ISIS, I suspect, considers Islam relevant to its cause of creating a 7th century caliphate.

But that is not to say that there aren’t some elements of foreign policy in which the Obama administration thinks religion — even Islam — is a key component. Secretary of State John Kerry stated on Sept. 3 that “religion matters,” and he’s made it “a mantra” in his State Department and his foreign policy stance.

Of course, Kerry didn’t say that in context of the stuff Obama talked about Wednesday night — the struggle for freedom and human rights against the Islamo-fascists of ISIS. No, no, no, no, no. “Religion matters” only when it comes to the fight against man-caused global warming — which has paused for nearly 18 years, and which scientists say is not primarily caused by human activity.

Kerry also said in February that man-caused global warming (which isn’t happening) is as “big a threat to the world as terrorism, poverty, and weapons of mass destruction.” And, in a pander to his audience, Kerry said global warming (which also isn’t a crisis) will hurt Muslim countries worst of all.

Top. Men.

HT: Our friend Anthony Watts, who has more here. Watch Kerry’s statement below:

Categories: On the Blog

More Observations on Obama's Speech

Stuff We Wish We Wrote - Homepage - September 10, 2014, 10:28 PM
Shortly, Paul will note the most important problems with President Obama’s speech tonight. In the meantime, here are a few secondary observations: 1) Obama…

CO2 Going Up. Human Progress Going Up. | Cato @ Liberty

Environment Suite - In The News - September 10, 2014, 10:15 PM
Latest Study Responsible Counterterrorism Policy John Mueller and Mark G. Stewart Featured Event August 26 Featuring Dan Mitchell, Senior Fellow, Cato…

CO2 Going Up. Human Progress Going Up. | Cato @ Liberty

Stuff We Wish We Wrote - Homepage - September 10, 2014, 10:15 PM
Latest Study Responsible Counterterrorism Policy John Mueller and Mark G. Stewart Featured Event August 26 Featuring Dan Mitchell, Senior Fellow, Cato…

EXCLUSIVE: Key analyst says talk radio’s biggest companies close to pulling the plug | Jerry Del Colliano says format’s days are numbered, cites recent moves | Media Equalizer

Stuff We Wish We Wrote - Homepage - September 10, 2014, 1:38 PM
It was a move that sent shudders through an already-nervous radio industry: Pittsburgh’s WPGB-FM suddenly dumped its talk format, switching to country music.…

Quin Hillyer - Why a Nine-Month Extension of Ex-Im Is a Thoroughly Terrible Idea

FIRE Suite - In The News - September 10, 2014, 1:38 PM
No. Just no. No way. That should be the response of every real conservative to the proposed Appropriations Continuing Resolution, put forth today by committee…

Quin Hillyer - Why a Nine-Month Extension of Ex-Im Is a Thoroughly Terrible Idea

Stuff We Wish We Wrote - Homepage - September 10, 2014, 1:38 PM
No. Just no. No way. That should be the response of every real conservative to the proposed Appropriations Continuing Resolution, put forth today by committee…

Reid, Udall Launch New Assault on Citizens United and the First Amendment - US News

Law Suit - In The News - September 10, 2014, 12:56 PM
Free speech for whom? Nevada Democratic Sen. Harry Reid is anything but these days. As Senate majority leader, he gets to set the agenda for the chamber – when…
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