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A more affordable D.C. starts with easing land rules

Out of the Storm News - April 07, 2014, 12:37 PM

In her April 4 Metro column, “A plan to fix D.C.’s housing crisis can’t wait till Nov.,” Petula Dvorak rightly lamented the district’s high housing costs, but her policy prescriptions won’t fix the problem. “We need to be ruthless in demanding that developers acknowledge the housing crisis and dedicate more of their units to lower-income residents,” she wrote.

The few people lucky enough to live in set-aside units would certainly benefit from lower rent, but a handful of units in new buildings will do little to address overall affordability. District rents are high because the stock of housing isn’t expanding quickly enough to accommodate everyone who wants to live here. To fend off further price increases we need to examine the ways our current policies artificially limit the supply of housing. Land-use regulations such as restrictive zoning, parking minimums and minimum lot sizes make dense development illegal in many parts of the district. The lengthy entitlement process allows NIMBYs to limit the size of new buildings and keep newcomers out of their neighborhoods.

We won’t need to be “ruthless in demanding that developers acknowledge the housing crisis” if we change our restrictive policies. Liberalizing land-use rules would allow developers to make money by increasing the supply of housing , and it would make for a more affordable district.

HOT & bothered

Out of the Storm News - April 07, 2014, 11:38 AM

From the Weekly Standard:

And it’s not as if we don’t need more highways. As Reihan Salam noted in a 2013 paper for the libertarian think tank R Street, the cost of maintaining and upgrading roadways to handle their current load in the United States runs to the hundreds of billions of dollars—which most state governments are at present unable or unwilling to pay themselves. Salam argues that road pricing (including both HOT lanes and other schemes) holds some promise. Yet Salam is careful to note that road pricing is no panacea.

Common Core Dates Back to the Marxist-Socialist Paradigm of UN Charter

Blog - Education - April 07, 2014, 10:32 AM

[This article is co-authored by Bonnie O'Neil]

The United Nations Agenda 21 has quietly changed the makeup of our cities and rural areas through highly questionable tactics, clothed in lofty adjectives such as ”smart growth” and “sustainability,” as we’ve written previously. Agenda 21 activists have quietly initiated laws that allowed the government to confiscate our land, water, private property, and wilderness areas. Their ultimate goal is to strip Americans of personal rights and freedoms, creating a socialist future and eventually a one-world government.  Not a pretty picture!

A necessary path to obtain those desired changes must include the indoctrination of children through education. That explains why our public schools have become increasingly liberal over the past couple of decades. Not enough citizens have challenged the progressive educators and their agenda, even though the changes were radical departures from what our Country had believed appropriate in the past.

A plan to indoctrinate our children with communist ideals has been in the works at least as far back as 1963, and probably longer. One of the first obvious steps was to take prayer and the 10 commandments out of all our public schools. Amazingly, there was little public outcry!  Next, traditional school plays suddenly forbade students to sing familiar, Christmas songs such as “Silent Night.” The cleansing of Christianity from schools escalated when any mention of Christianity by students was discouraged, and in some instances students who even mentioned the name of Jesus on school grounds were disciplined.

Following the absence of Christian values in classrooms, sex education classes became popular, complete with intimate graphics and condoms freely handed out to students.  Stimulated with sexual material, and free contraceptives, a clear message was sent to students that their school expected them to engage in sexual activities, but with instructions to be careful. Still, there was only a mild disapproval from the public.

With so little negative reaction, schools and the liberal movement became even bolder. They defied parental rights by taking under aged teens to abortion clinics, not only without their parents’ permission but without their knowledge as well. The schools had the approval of the state and judicial system to do so. A few young teens had serious problems after their abortions, but because the parents had no idea why they were ill, the young women did not get medical help until it was too late to save their lives. Still, no strong public outcry!

Apparently, the social issues aren’t important enough to energize people to object, but what about concern that many Communist goals have been quietly incorporated into mainstream America through our public schools? Especially guilty of this blatant indoctrination are the thousands of liberal professors in our nation’s colleges, where 63 percent of professors identify themselves as liberal, while only12 percent as conservatives.  Severely outnumbered, the conservatives remained pretty quiet, while the liberals often abuse their positions by forcing their political views on a captured classroom of vulnerable students.

We are reminded of the Communists’ expressed plan to use schools as transmission belts for socialism and Communist propaganda. To succeed they realized the importance of nationalizing our entire school system, allowing liberals to decide school curriculum, controlling the teacher associations, limiting parental involvement, and cleverly inserting the party platform in school textbooks.  We are now seeing many of those goals have been realized.  Recently, the current Administration hi-jacked our public school system and replaced it with the controversial and experimental Common Core system. You guessed it, many of the communist goals now exist in the Common Core curriculum.

How were the progressives able to insert Common Core into all our nation’s schools, when our forefathers wisely assigned the responsibility of education to the individual states?   Officials within the federal government cleverly and quietly side-stepped laws, and aggressively sold this new program to the states, with the help of hundreds of millions of dollars to promote it which came from people who stand to gain substantially from Common Core in time.  Bill Gates was one of the most prolific donors, and obviously he will profit greatly.  Schools will be buying his computers and accompanying products for most every student in America. One can only guess at the massive profit he will be experience.

The original idea for Common Core originated as part of UN Agenda 21, with ideas they borrowed from International Baccalaureate (IB); a group that was founded in Geneva, Switzerland in 1968 as a non-profit educational foundation.  IB World schools were also created here in the U.S.  The International Baccalaureate is recognized today as a globally oriented program and a UNESCO partnership program emphasizing sustainability teaching to children and collectivist, socialist indoctrination.  A network of their schools still exist in 147 countries including the U.S.

Aspects of the Common Core agenda has roots identified in the Center for Educational Renewal (CER) founded in part by John Goodlad in1985 within the College of Education, University of Washington, in Seattle.   Publication of an agenda in 1992 by John Goodlad entitled “Agenda for Education in a Democracy,” deviates greatly in its message from that which our Constitution guarantees to us.  A disturbing quote that verifies just how far this group had deviated can be seen in “Agenda for Education in a Democracy” and the following quote:

“Enlightened social engineering is required to face situations that demand global action now  . . . Parents and the general public must be reached also, otherwise, children and youth enrolled in globally oriented programs may find themselves in conflict with values assumed in the home.  And then the educational institution frequently comes under scrutiny and must pull back.”

Common Core is a direct result from U.N. Agenda 21, which is evidenced in Chapter 36 which deals with “Education, Public Awareness, and Training.”   It is one part of the comprehensive plan of action adopted and signed on to by more than 168 Governments  — G.H. Bush represented the United States in its signing, while Bill Clinton later embraced Agenda 21  — at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development held in Rio de Janerio, Brazil  June 3 – 5, 1992. The Commission of Sustainable Development (CSD) was created in December of 1992 to ensure effective follow-up.  Education is indispensable for the U.N. to get its agenda established.

Then too, consider the U.N. Constitution which is a Marxist socialist paradigm where world regionalism is spelled out clearly in Chapters 8 through 11.  Those chapters use  terms  such as “regional arrangements, intergovernmental agreements, and metropolitan areas.” The U.N. Charter became effective on June 25, 1945.  President Harry S. Truman signed the United Nations Charter on August 8, 1945, and with its signing the United States became the first nation to complete the ratification process to join the new international organization.

The goal then became how to insert a national liberal education program into America; one that was in tune with the New World Order expressed in the 1945 U.N. Charter.  First, needed was publicly proclaiming that our system was inferior. The government and our media began releasing reports that our school system needed to be vastly improved. Nobody has a problem with improving our school system. However, Common Core was not the solution, because it changed what did not need changing, while failed to address the known problems that still plague our school system.  Parents and educators complain Common core is proving detrimental in a variety of ways.  Sadly, bright, straight A students who once loved going to school, now dread their classes.  That is creating obvious tension within homes between parents and their children, as well as with teachers, some of whom are so disgusted they are resigning from their loved profession.

Common Core’s plan for our children is a topic of utmost concern, as it is engineering students into a progressive, socialist agenda.  Subsequent articles will explore how Common Core was covertly engineered at the federal level by a relatively small group of far left people, most of whom were not educators; and that the program was not adequately tested.  Our next article will reveal how those involved and associated Common Core stand to make huge profits.  Some believe federal laws have been broken, but at the very least the tradition and intent that the federal government not intrude into the states’ education responsibilities has been compromise.  A subsequent article will go into more depth as we explain how and why states accepted Common Core sight unseen, and who will stand to make huge profits.  Most importantly we will explain what some citizens are now doing to stop Common Core.

 

[Originally published at Illinois Review]

Common Core Dates Back to the Marxist-Socialist Paradigm of UN Charter

Somewhat Reasonable - April 07, 2014, 10:32 AM

[This article is co-authored by Bonnie O'Neil]

The United Nations Agenda 21 has quietly changed the makeup of our cities and rural areas through highly questionable tactics, clothed in lofty adjectives such as ”smart growth” and “sustainability,” as we’ve written previously. Agenda 21 activists have quietly initiated laws that allowed the government to confiscate our land, water, private property, and wilderness areas. Their ultimate goal is to strip Americans of personal rights and freedoms, creating a socialist future and eventually a one-world government.  Not a pretty picture!

A necessary path to obtain those desired changes must include the indoctrination of children through education. That explains why our public schools have become increasingly liberal over the past couple of decades. Not enough citizens have challenged the progressive educators and their agenda, even though the changes were radical departures from what our Country had believed appropriate in the past.

A plan to indoctrinate our children with communist ideals has been in the works at least as far back as 1963, and probably longer. One of the first obvious steps was to take prayer and the 10 commandments out of all our public schools. Amazingly, there was little public outcry!  Next, traditional school plays suddenly forbade students to sing familiar, Christmas songs such as “Silent Night.” The cleansing of Christianity from schools escalated when any mention of Christianity by students was discouraged, and in some instances students who even mentioned the name of Jesus on school grounds were disciplined.

Following the absence of Christian values in classrooms, sex education classes became popular, complete with intimate graphics and condoms freely handed out to students.  Stimulated with sexual material, and free contraceptives, a clear message was sent to students that their school expected them to engage in sexual activities, but with instructions to be careful. Still, there was only a mild disapproval from the public.

With so little negative reaction, schools and the liberal movement became even bolder. They defied parental rights by taking under aged teens to abortion clinics, not only without their parents’ permission but without their knowledge as well. The schools had the approval of the state and judicial system to do so. A few young teens had serious problems after their abortions, but because the parents had no idea why they were ill, the young women did not get medical help until it was too late to save their lives. Still, no strong public outcry!

Apparently, the social issues aren’t important enough to energize people to object, but what about concern that many Communist goals have been quietly incorporated into mainstream America through our public schools? Especially guilty of this blatant indoctrination are the thousands of liberal professors in our nation’s colleges, where 63 percent of professors identify themselves as liberal, while only12 percent as conservatives.  Severely outnumbered, the conservatives remained pretty quiet, while the liberals often abuse their positions by forcing their political views on a captured classroom of vulnerable students.

We are reminded of the Communists’ expressed plan to use schools as transmission belts for socialism and Communist propaganda. To succeed they realized the importance of nationalizing our entire school system, allowing liberals to decide school curriculum, controlling the teacher associations, limiting parental involvement, and cleverly inserting the party platform in school textbooks.  We are now seeing many of those goals have been realized.  Recently, the current Administration hi-jacked our public school system and replaced it with the controversial and experimental Common Core system. You guessed it, many of the communist goals now exist in the Common Core curriculum.

How were the progressives able to insert Common Core into all our nation’s schools, when our forefathers wisely assigned the responsibility of education to the individual states?   Officials within the federal government cleverly and quietly side-stepped laws, and aggressively sold this new program to the states, with the help of hundreds of millions of dollars to promote it which came from people who stand to gain substantially from Common Core in time.  Bill Gates was one of the most prolific donors, and obviously he will profit greatly.  Schools will be buying his computers and accompanying products for most every student in America. One can only guess at the massive profit he will be experience.

The original idea for Common Core originated as part of UN Agenda 21, with ideas they borrowed from International Baccalaureate (IB); a group that was founded in Geneva, Switzerland in 1968 as a non-profit educational foundation.  IB World schools were also created here in the U.S.  The International Baccalaureate is recognized today as a globally oriented program and a UNESCO partnership program emphasizing sustainability teaching to children and collectivist, socialist indoctrination.  A network of their schools still exist in 147 countries including the U.S.

Aspects of the Common Core agenda has roots identified in the Center for Educational Renewal (CER) founded in part by John Goodlad in1985 within the College of Education, University of Washington, in Seattle.   Publication of an agenda in 1992 by John Goodlad entitled “Agenda for Education in a Democracy,” deviates greatly in its message from that which our Constitution guarantees to us.  A disturbing quote that verifies just how far this group had deviated can be seen in “Agenda for Education in a Democracy” and the following quote:

“Enlightened social engineering is required to face situations that demand global action now  . . . Parents and the general public must be reached also, otherwise, children and youth enrolled in globally oriented programs may find themselves in conflict with values assumed in the home.  And then the educational institution frequently comes under scrutiny and must pull back.”

Common Core is a direct result from U.N. Agenda 21, which is evidenced in Chapter 36 which deals with “Education, Public Awareness, and Training.”   It is one part of the comprehensive plan of action adopted and signed on to by more than 168 Governments  — G.H. Bush represented the United States in its signing, while Bill Clinton later embraced Agenda 21  — at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development held in Rio de Janerio, Brazil  June 3 – 5, 1992. The Commission of Sustainable Development (CSD) was created in December of 1992 to ensure effective follow-up.  Education is indispensable for the U.N. to get its agenda established.

Then too, consider the U.N. Constitution which is a Marxist socialist paradigm where world regionalism is spelled out clearly in Chapters 8 through 11.  Those chapters use  terms  such as “regional arrangements, intergovernmental agreements, and metropolitan areas.” The U.N. Charter became effective on June 25, 1945.  President Harry S. Truman signed the United Nations Charter on August 8, 1945, and with its signing the United States became the first nation to complete the ratification process to join the new international organization.

The goal then became how to insert a national liberal education program into America; one that was in tune with the New World Order expressed in the 1945 U.N. Charter.  First, needed was publicly proclaiming that our system was inferior. The government and our media began releasing reports that our school system needed to be vastly improved. Nobody has a problem with improving our school system. However, Common Core was not the solution, because it changed what did not need changing, while failed to address the known problems that still plague our school system.  Parents and educators complain Common core is proving detrimental in a variety of ways.  Sadly, bright, straight A students who once loved going to school, now dread their classes.  That is creating obvious tension within homes between parents and their children, as well as with teachers, some of whom are so disgusted they are resigning from their loved profession.

Common Core’s plan for our children is a topic of utmost concern, as it is engineering students into a progressive, socialist agenda.  Subsequent articles will explore how Common Core was covertly engineered at the federal level by a relatively small group of far left people, most of whom were not educators; and that the program was not adequately tested.  Our next article will reveal how those involved and associated Common Core stand to make huge profits.  Some believe federal laws have been broken, but at the very least the tradition and intent that the federal government not intrude into the states’ education responsibilities has been compromise.  A subsequent article will go into more depth as we explain how and why states accepted Common Core sight unseen, and who will stand to make huge profits.  Most importantly we will explain what some citizens are now doing to stop Common Core.

 

[Originally published at Illinois Review]

Categories: On the Blog

Columnist: Childless Americans should pay higher taxes

Out of the Storm News - April 07, 2014, 10:16 AM

From Fox News:

A Slate.com columnist says that childless Americans should pay higher taxes.

“Who should pay more? Nonparents who earn more than the median household income, just a shade above $51,000. By shifting the tax burden from parents to nonparents, we will help give America’s children a better start in life, and we will help correct a simple injustice,” Reihan Salam said in an article on Slate.com.

Perils of Commercial Beekeeping

Somewhat Reasonable - April 07, 2014, 10:13 AM

One of America’s earliest food crops – almonds – is also one of the most important for commercial beekeepers. Almonds depend on bees for pollination, but the explosive growth of this bumper crop taxes the very honeybees the industry needs to thrive.

California’s Central Valley produces over 80% of the world’s almonds, valued at over $4 billion in 2012. The boom is poised to continue, with new food products and expanding overseas markets increasing demand to the point that no young almond trees are available for purchase until 2016.

Demand for almonds translates into demand for pollination. So every year commercial beekeepers transport some 60% of all US honeybees to California’s almond groves in February and March, when it’s still winter in most other states. It’s one of their biggest challenges.

For one thing, bee colonies, especially those from northern states, lack sufficient time to emerge from their heat-conserving winter clusters. Some beekeepers thus maintain 20,000 to 30,000 hives. Each one requires careful inspection for diseases and parasites – a meticulous, Herculean task on such a scale.

Complicating the situation, beekeepers are trying to work within a large-scale agricultural system, using an insect whose husbandry practices have changed little since the nineteenth century. The larger the commercial beekeeper’s stock, the harder it can be to tend them and recover from financial setbacks in the form of lost bees.

Almond growers will need 1.5 million hives this year, estimates Colorado beekeeper Lyle Johnston. “It takes almost all the commercial bees in the United States,” to pollinate the almond crop, he says. The payoff can amount to half an individual keeper’s yearly profit.

However, bees can come back from California “loaded with mites and every other disease you can think of,” beekeeper Ed Colby explains. That can often mean bee colony deaths. Last year, US beekeepers experienced an average 30% overwinter bee loss; some lost 10% to 15% of their hives, while others lost much more. It’s a normal cost of doing business, but it can be painful.

Last year’s rate was higher than normal, and higher than any keeper would want. But it was not the “bee-pocalypse” that some news stories claimed. The real story is that efforts to identify a single unifying cause for higher-than-usual losses have failed. Scientists are discovering that multiple issues affect bee health.

Urban, suburban and agricultural “development has reduced natural habitats, clearing out thousands of acres of clover and natural flowers,” a 60 Minutesinvestigative report observed. “Instead, bees are spending week after week on the road, feeding on a single crop, undernourished and overworked.”

The migration itself is stressful, notes Glenwood Springs, Colorado Post-Independent reporter Marilyn Gleason. “First, there’s the road trip, which isn’t exactly natural for bees, and may include freezing cold or scorching heat. Bees ship out of Colorado before the coldest weather, and drivers may drench hot, thirsty bees with water at the truck wash.”

The convergence in almond groves of so many commercial bees from all over the country creates a hotbed of viruses and pathogens that can spread to many hives. The varroa destructor mite carries at least 19 different bee viruses and diseases, causing major impacts on bee colonies. Parasitic phorid flies are another problem, and highly contagious infections also pose significant threats. The intestinal fungus nosema ceranae, for example, prevents bees from absorbing nutrition, resulting in starvation.

The tobacco ringspot virus was likewise linked recently to the highly publicized problem known as “colony collapse disorder.” CCD occurs when bees in a colony disappear, leaving behind only a queen and a few workers. The term originally lumped together a variety of such “disappearing” disorders recorded in different locales across hundreds of years, as far back as 950 AD in Ireland. Thankfully, as during past episodes, these unexplained incidents have declined in recent years and, despite all these challenges, overall US honeybee populations and the number of managed colonies have held steady for nearly 20 years.

These days, perhaps the biggest existential threat to bees is campaigns purporting to save them. Extreme-green groups like the Center for Food Safety and Pesticide Action Network of North America are blaming an innovative new class of pesticides called neonicotinoids for both over-winter bee losses and CCD.

Allied with several outspoken beekeepers, the activists are pressuring the Environmental Protection Agency, Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency and government regulatory agencies to follow Europe’s lead – and ban neonics. Instead of protecting bees and beekeepers, however, their campaigns will likely cause greater harm – because they ignore the multiple threats that scientists have identified, and because a neonic ban will result in farmers using pesticides that are more toxic to bees.

The European Union’s political decision to suspend neonic use came because France’s new agriculture minister banned their use. That meant French farmers would be at a distinct disadvantage with the rest of Europe, if they were the only ones unable to use the pesticide, noted British environmental commentator Richard North. They could lose $278 million per season in lost yields and extra pesticide spraying.

So the French agricultural ministry sought an EU-wide ban on all neonicotinoids. After several votes and a misleading report on the science, the European Commission imposed a ban, over the objections of many other EU members, who note that the evidence clearly demonstrates the new pesticides are safe for bees.

Years-long field tests have found that real-world exposures have no observable effects on bee colonies. Other studies have highlighted other significant insect, fungal, human and other issues that, singly or collectively, could explain CCD. Having analyzed scores of 2007-2012 bee death incidents, Canadian bee experts concluded that “…very few of the serious bee kills involve neonicotinoid pesticides. Five times as many ‘major’ or ‘moderate’ pesticide-related bee kills were sourced to non-neonic chemicals.”

In Canada’s western provinces, almost 20 million acres of 100% neonic-treated canola is pollinated annually by honeybees and tiny alfalfa leaf-cutter bees. Both species thrive on the crop, demonstrating that neonics are not a problem. Large-scale field studies of honeybees at Canadian universities and a bumblebee field study by a UK government agency found no adverse effects on bees.

Last October, a team of industry scientists published a four-year study of the effects of repeated honeybee exposure to neonic-treated corn and rapeseed (canola) pollen and nectar under field conditions in several French provinces. The study found similar mortality, foraging behavior, colony strength and weight, brood development and food storage in colonies exposed to seed-treated crops and in unexposed control colonies. This also indicates low risk to bees.

At least two more major, recently completed university-run field research projects conducted under complex, costly scientific laboratory guidelines (“good lab practices”) are awaiting publication. All indications to date suggest that they too will find no observable adverse effects on bees at field-realistic exposures to neonicotinoids.

Meanwhile Project ApisM., a partnership of agro-businesses and beekeepers, has invested $2.5 million in research to enhance the health of honeybee colonies. Switzerland-based Syngenta has spent millions expanding bee habitats in Europe and North America, through Project Pollinator. Bayer has built bee health centers in Europe and the United States, and Monsanto’s Beeologics subsidiary is developing technology to fight varroa mites.

None of that matters to the anti-pesticide activists. They are using pressure tactics to make Canada and the United States copy the EU. That would be a huge mistake. Science, not politics, should prevail.

 

[Originally published at Townhall]
Categories: On the Blog

Special Report: 2013 Metropolitan Area Population Estimates

Somewhat Reasonable - April 07, 2014, 10:04 AM

The 2013 annual metropolitan area population estimates by the US Census Bureau indicate a continuing and persistent dominance of population growth and domestic migration by the South. Between 2010 and 2013, 51 percent of the population increase in the 52 major metropolitan areas (over 1 million population) was in the South. The West accounted for 30 percent of the increase, followed by the Northeast at 11 percent and eight percent in the North Central (Midwest).

Components of Population Change: Major Metropolitan Areas

The dominance of the South was even greater when we turn to net domestic migration between Census Bureau regions. Nearly 785,000 more people moved to the major metropolitan areas of the South from other parts of the country than left. A much smaller 170,000 net domestic migrants moved to major metropolitan areas in the West. At the same time the Northeast lost 485,000 net domestic migrants and the Midwest lost 280,000.

Perhaps even more remarkable, the South, long a laggard as an immigrant destination, even led in net international migration (666,000 for a 1.2 percent over three years), though the Northeast added 546,000, for a 1.0 percent rate). Net international migration to the West was about the same, some 454,000 for a 1.0 percent rate. The Midwest had the lowest net international migration in the country and well below any other region (280,000, for a 0.6 percent rate), as is indicated in Table 1.

There was a substantial gap in the natural increase (births minus deaths) between the regions as well. The West (2.1 percent relative to the 2010 population over the three years) lead the South (2.0 percent) slightly in rate. Both were well ahead of the Midwest at 1.5 percent and especially the Northeast, at 1.2 percent (Table 1).

 

 

Table 1 Components of Population Change by Region Major Metropolitan Areas Total Natural Growth (Births Minus Deaths) Net Domestic Migration Net International Migration Northeast              546,742              434,872             (434,029)              545,899 South           2,555,304           1,105,631              783,438              666,235 North Central              398,536              472,017             (280,022)              206,541 West           1,543,319              917,852              171,444              454,023 Change Compared to 2010 Population Northeast 1.5% 1.2% -1.2% 1.5% South 4.6% 2.0% 1.4% 1.2% North Central 1.2% 1.5% -0.9% 0.6% West 3.5% 2.1% 0.4% 1.0% From Census Bureau Data

 

Population Growth

The New York metropolitan area continues to hold the top position, having added nearly 400,000 residents since 2010 to rise to a population of 19,950,000 residents. At its current rate of growth, New York will exceed a population of 20 million in 2014. There was a time that many expected second-place Los Angeles to overtake New York. However, since 1990 the New York population advantage over Los Angeles has expanded from 6.1 million to 6.8 million, including a further 80,000 advantage built up since 2010 (present geographical definitions). Part of this because much of the growth has been pushed to the more distant Riverside-San Bernardino area.

Los Angeles and Chicago continued to retain the second and third positions, which they seem likely to maintain for decades. Population projections by the National Conference of Mayors indicates strong growth in Dallas-Fort Worth and Houston over the next three decades could have them by pass Chicago by 2050. The challenge could be even more immediate, since Chicago’s growth rate over the first three years of the decade is approximately one half the annual rate projected by the US Conference of Mayors between 2012 and 2042.

Late in the last decade, Dallas-Fort Worth passed Philadelphia to become the fourth largest metropolitan area. Then, Philadelphia was passed by Houston in 2011. The result is that, for the first time since the nation’s founding, two of the five largest cities (which are functionally defined as metropolitan areas) are in a single state (Texas).

Philadelphia seems likely to fall further. The strong growth rate of seventh ranked Washington suggests that this nearby rival may also pass Philadelphia as early as 2015. Eighth ranked Miami is growing fast enough that it also could drop Philadelphia a position, to 8th place the 2020 census.

But Philadelphia is not the only metropolitan area in relative decline. Detroit started the decade as the nation’s 12th largest metropolitan area, but has since fallen to 14th. Detroit has been passed by both Riverside-San Bernardino and Phoenix. Phoenix rose 14th to 12th, passing Riverside-San Bernardino (which remained in 13th position) in the process.

Among the 52 major metropolitan areas, Austin has grown at the greatest percentage rate since 2010 with Raleigh was the second fastest growing. Houston was the third fastest growing major metropolitan area over the three year period. Orlando ranked 4th in growth from 2010, while San Antonio was the fifth. The top ten was rounded out by Denver, Washington, Dallas-Fort Worth, Charlotte and Oklahoma City. Thus, among the 10 fastest-growing major metropolitan areas, nine were in the South and one (Denver) was in the West (Table 2).

 

Table 2 Major Metropolitan Area Population: 2010, 2012 & 2013 Metropolitan Areas 2010 2012 2013 2010-13 2012-13 Atlanta, GA       5,304,197       5,454,429       5,522,942 4.12% 1.26% Austin, TX       1,727,784       1,835,110       1,883,051 8.99% 2.61% Baltimore, MD       2,715,312       2,753,922       2,770,738 2.04% 0.61% Birmingham, AL       1,129,096       1,134,915       1,140,300 0.99% 0.47% Boston, MA-NH       4,564,054       4,642,095       4,684,299 2.63% 0.91% Buffalo, NY       1,135,314       1,133,767       1,134,115 -0.11% 0.03% Charlotte, NC-SC       2,223,635       2,294,990       2,335,358 5.02% 1.76% Chicago, IL-IN-WI       9,470,335       9,514,059       9,537,289 0.71% 0.24% Cincinnati, OH-KY-IN       2,117,344       2,129,309       2,137,406 0.95% 0.38% Cleveland, OH       2,075,690       2,064,739       2,064,725 -0.53% 0.00% Columbus, OH       1,906,243       1,944,937       1,967,066 3.19% 1.14% Dallas-Fort Worth, TX       6,452,758       6,702,801       6,810,913 5.55% 1.61% Denver, CO       2,553,829       2,646,694       2,697,476 5.62% 1.92% Detroit,  MI       4,291,400       4,292,832       4,294,983 0.08% 0.05% Grand Rapids, MI          989,196       1,005,493       1,016,603 2.77% 1.10% Hartford, CT       1,214,014       1,214,503       1,215,211 0.10% 0.06% Houston, TX       5,948,689       6,175,466       6,313,158 6.13% 2.23% Indianapolis. IN       1,892,323       1,929,207       1,953,961 3.26% 1.28% Jacksonville, FL       1,349,095       1,378,040       1,394,624 3.37% 1.20% Kansas City, MO-KS       2,013,691       2,038,690       2,054,473 2.03% 0.77% Las Vegas, NV       1,953,106       1,997,659       2,027,868 3.83% 1.51% Los Angeles, CA     12,844,070     13,037,045     13,131,431 2.24% 0.72% Louisville, KY-IN       1,237,851       1,251,538       1,262,261 1.97% 0.86% Memphis, TN-MS-AR       1,326,595       1,340,739       1,341,746 1.14% 0.08% Miami, FL       5,581,524       5,763,282       5,828,191 4.42% 1.13% Milwaukee,WI       1,556,549       1,566,182       1,569,659 0.84% 0.22% Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN-WI       3,355,167       3,422,417       3,459,146 3.10% 1.07% Nashville, TN       1,675,945       1,726,759       1,757,912 4.89% 1.80% New Orleans. LA       1,195,757       1,227,656       1,240,977 3.78% 1.09% New York, NY-NJ-PA     19,596,183     19,837,753     19,949,502 1.80% 0.56% Oklahoma City, OK       1,257,883       1,297,397       1,319,677 4.91% 1.72% Orlando, FL       2,139,372       2,223,456       2,267,846 6.01% 2.00% Philadelphia, PA-NJ-DE-MD       5,971,397       6,019,533       6,034,678 1.06% 0.25% Phoenix, AZ       4,208,770       4,327,632       4,398,762 4.51% 1.64% Pittsburgh, PA       2,356,658       2,360,989       2,360,867 0.18% -0.01% Portland, OR-WA       2,232,177       2,289,038       2,314,554 3.69% 1.11% Providence, RI-MA       1,601,798       1,601,160       1,604,291 0.16% 0.20% Raleigh, NC       1,137,351       1,188,504       1,214,516 6.78% 2.19% Richmond, VA       1,210,015       1,232,954       1,245,764 2.95% 1.04% Riverside-San Bernardino, CA       4,244,089       4,342,332       4,380,878 3.22% 0.89% Rochester, NY       1,080,081       1,082,375       1,083,278 0.30% 0.08% Sacramento, CA       2,154,417       2,193,927       2,215,770 2.85% 1.00% St. Louis,, MO-IL       2,789,893       2,796,506       2,801,056 0.40% 0.16% Salt Lake City, UT       1,091,452       1,123,943       1,140,483 4.49% 1.47% San Antonio, TX       2,153,288       2,234,494       2,277,550 5.77% 1.93% San Diego, CA       3,104,182       3,176,138       3,211,252 3.45% 1.11% San Francisco-Oakland, CA       4,344,584       4,454,159       4,516,276 3.95% 1.39% San Jose, CA       1,842,076       1,892,894       1,919,641 4.21% 1.41% Seattle, WA       3,448,425       3,552,591       3,610,105 4.69% 1.62% Tampa-St. Petersburg, FL       2,788,961       2,845,178       2,870,569 2.93% 0.89% Virginia Beach-Norfolk, VA-NC       1,680,120       1,698,410       1,707,369 1.62% 0.53% Washington, DC-VA-MD-WV       5,664,789       5,862,594       5,949,859 5.03% 1.49% Major Metropolitan Areas   169,898,524   173,253,232   174,942,425 2.97% 0.97% From Census Bureau Data

 

Domestic Migration

Net domestic migration is, not surprisingly, dominated by the major metropolitan areas of the South, especially Texas and Florida. Dallas-Fort Worth and Houston led the nation with more than 100,000 net domestic migrants (Figure $$$). Austin placed third in San Antonio was sixth. Charlotte ranked seventh, while the Florida entries Orlando stood at eighth and Tampa-St. Petersburg at 10th. The West had three big domestic migration lures, Phoenix (4th), Denver (5th), and Seattle (9th).

Austin also led in the percentage of net domestic migration gain relative to its 2010 population. Again, nine of the top gainers were in the South, with one entry from the West, Denver (Figure 2).

The largest net domestic migration losses were more dispersed across the country, with metropolitan areas from every region represented. New York lost the most net domestic migrants (more than 300,000) and was joined by Philadelphia, Hartford, and Providence from the East. Chicago lost the second most domestic migrants (more than 150,000) and was joined by Detroit, St. Louis and Cleveland from the Midwest. Los Angeles ranked third in the bottom 10, losing more than 100,000 net domestic migrants, the only western metropolitan area to suffer a significant migration loss. The South’s only representative in the bottom 10 was Virginia Beach-Norfolk (Figure 3).

 

Table 3 Major Metropolitan Area Net Migration: 2010 to 2013 Metropolitan Areas Net Domestic Migration Change Relative to 2010 Population Net International Migration Change Relative to 2010 Population Atlanta, GA      44,433 0.84%         49,375 0.93% Austin, TX      87,189 5.05%         15,685 0.91% Baltimore, MD          (121) 0.00%         24,366 0.90% Birmingham, AL       (2,918) -0.26%           3,585 0.32% Boston, MA-NH           101 0.00%         70,356 1.54% Buffalo, NY       (7,774) -0.68%           7,341 0.65% Charlotte, NC-SC      56,478 2.54%         14,590 0.66% Chicago, IL-IN-WI   (161,558) -1.71%         69,041 0.73% Cincinnati, OH-KY-IN     (16,893) -0.80%           9,703 0.46% Cleveland, OH     (28,780) -1.39%         10,837 0.52% Columbus, OH      11,425 0.60%         13,752 0.72% Dallas-Fort Worth, TX    127,315 1.97%         57,403 0.89% Denver, CO      70,668 2.77%         14,160 0.55% Detroit,  MI     (58,343) -1.36%         30,281 0.71% Grand Rapids, MI        4,594 0.46%           3,290 0.33% Hartford, CT     (18,979) -1.56%         15,206 1.25% Houston, TX    116,956 1.97%         74,817 1.26% Indianapolis. IN      13,698 0.72%         12,031 0.64% Jacksonville, FL      16,932 1.26%           9,760 0.72% Kansas City, MO-KS       (3,738) -0.19%           9,162 0.45% Las Vegas, NV      17,419 0.89%         19,041 0.97% Los Angeles, CA   (125,037) -0.97%       145,101 1.13% Louisville, KY-IN        4,874 0.39%           6,530 0.53% Memphis, TN-MS-AR     (13,723) -1.03%           4,868 0.37% Miami, FL      31,750 0.57%       152,998 2.74% Milwaukee,WI     (14,282) -0.92%           6,547 0.42% Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN-WI        2,664 0.08%         30,341 0.90% Nashville, TN      42,090 2.51%         10,201 0.61% New Orleans. LA      20,721 1.73%           8,727 0.73% New York, NY-NJ-PA   (336,566) -1.72%       372,651 1.90% Oklahoma City, OK      30,086 2.39%           6,759 0.54% Orlando, FL      49,244 2.30%         43,230 2.02% Philadelphia, PA-NJ-DE-MD     (49,564) -0.83%         51,244 0.86% Phoenix, AZ      72,985 1.73%         24,885 0.59% Pittsburgh, PA        7,564 0.32%           8,129 0.34% Portland, OR-WA      30,244 1.35%         15,350 0.69% Providence, RI-MA     (17,253) -1.08%         13,365 0.83% Raleigh, NC      38,088 3.35%         10,875 0.96% Richmond, VA      10,777 0.89%           9,542 0.79% Riverside-San Bernardino, CA      18,321 0.43%         14,997 0.35% Rochester, NY     (11,558) -1.07%           7,607 0.70% Sacramento, CA        6,922 0.32%         17,662 0.82% St. Louis,, MO-IL     (28,809) -1.03%         11,556 0.41% Salt Lake City, UT        3,367 0.31%           7,560 0.69% San Antonio, TX      63,391 2.94%         10,778 0.50% San Diego, CA           455 0.01%         35,199 1.13% San Francisco-Oakland, CA      37,157 0.86%         68,510 1.58% San Jose, CA       (6,245) -0.34%         41,207 2.24% Seattle, WA      45,188 1.31%         50,351 1.46% Tampa-St. Petersburg, FL      45,071 1.62%         28,621 1.03% Virginia Beach-Norfolk, VA-NC     (17,944) -1.07%         15,650 0.93% Washington, DC-VA-MD-WV      32,749 0.58%       107,875 1.90% Total    240,831 0.14%    1,872,698 1.10% From Census Bureau Data

 

Migration Gains in the Suburbs, Losses in the Core

This year was notable for the virtual absence of the customary “return to the city” stories. In recent years, historical core municipalities have done better in population growth than in the past. In previous decades, some lost large amounts of their population. However, an improving urban environment, not least because of better crime control, has led to something of a residential resurgence, especially in the immediate area of downtowns, though inner core populations (within five miles of City Hall) have continue to decline (see Flocking Elsewhere: The Downtown Growth Story).

Specious claims of a net suburban movement to the cores have been refuted by the domestic migration data. Net domestic migration is reported by the Census Bureau only at the county level. Thus, any analysis of domestic migration between the cores and the suburbs must be county-based. During the Great Recession, domestic migration declined substantially, as is to be expected when the economy is depressed.

Yet, in each of the three years of this decade, suburban counties have experienced net domestic migration gains and in each year have substantially led the core counties. In only one year, 2012, was there a net domestic migration gain in the core counties. The most recent 2013 data shows that core counties experienced a 70,000 net domestic migration loss, while the suburban counties gained 163,000 net domestic migrants. This difference of 233,000 was approximately four times the demographic gains made by the suburbs in both of the previous years Figure 4).

Returning to Normalcy?

With the economy still depressed, it would be premature to declare that the more typical results of the last year presage a return to normalcy. Any such reliable judgment must await restoration of broad-based, job and salary driven – as opposed to asset-based – economic growth. However, the trends of the last year indicate more than anything that the basic patterns of at least the past quarter century – with higher suburban growth and a shift towards the South – to be reasserting themselves.

 

[Originally published at New Geography]
Categories: On the Blog

Troubling Parallels: New Math De Ja Vu and the Common Core

Blog - Education - April 07, 2014, 9:16 AM

Storm clouds have been gathering around the Common Core for some time. Until now, most of the critical attention has been on the political ramifications of the program, that it centralizes and federalizes teaching, diminishing the power of parents to participate in the educational process. When the criticism does turn to the content of the curriculum, it usually focuses on social studies, such as Joy Pullmann’s excellent account of the Common Core’s trashing of the Constitution and Founding Fathers. Yet the Common Core’s treatment of math is proving to be even more questionable.

Judging from sample questions, Common Core math tries to reinvent the wheel in terms of the process of teaching. It focuses less on the teaching of problem solving and more on trying to teach overarching concepts. The result is math problems that are startlingly complex.

Teaching complex problem solving may sound like great news at first. Who could object to educating our children to have a deep conceptual understanding of things? After all, we need to keep ahead in the information and technology race with the rest of the world, do we not? The problem with that way of thinking was dealt with succinctly by one parent shocked and frustrated by his child’s Common Core homework assignment:

The problem with the question is that it transforms a subtraction problem that takes a single step to answer using conventional methods into a multi-step problem that only cause confusion. In trying to explain the “deep concept” to a second-grader the problem can serves only to confuse and upset. It seems Common Core is trying a top-down redesign of the whole process of learning, a redesign the complexity of which does not help to educate childrem, but instead leaves them in confused ignorance.

Remarkably, this is not the first time the government has tried just such a redesign of math education. In the 1960s, the government rolled out a very similar curriculum called New Math. New Math was built around the application of Set Theory and employed non-standard numeral systems in the hopes of instilling in students a conceptual understanding of “number.” The idea was that by ingraining a deep conceptual understanding of math, more advanced math knowledge could be taught more widely.

The impetus for the change in math education was a perceived knowledge gap in the late 1950s in the hard sciences and engineering between the United States and the Soviet Union. With the launch of Sputnik, American politicians and civic leaders began to fret that the Soviets were overtaking America in technical proficiency and came to believe that this gap would lead to devastating consequences for America in the Cold War. New Math was meant to build up the knowledge base of the American youth in order to compete.

Common Core math has been rolled out under very similar circumstances. Again America is facing a rising geopolitical foe, this time in the shape of China, a country which is experiencing frighteningly swift economic and technological growth. Much as New Math was meant to transform the educational system in order to compete with the perceived superiority of the Soviet  system, so too is the Common Core meant to challenge the technical rise of China and other developing powers.

Yet New Math, somewhat unsurprisingly, failed miserably to catch on. It came under immediate criticism from educators, parents, and concerned citizens. Perhaps one of the most well remembered criticisms was delivered by the legendary mathematician and singer Tom Lehrer, whose song “New Math” was a raucous take-down of the absurdities of New Math (see video above).

One reason New Math failed to work was that teachers had to be entirely reeducated themselves in order to understand the complexity of the teaching methodology. Who would have thought that second-grade math teachers would not all have a working knowledge of Set Theory?

Another reason New Math failed was that the underlying premise, that broad-based high-level and practical mathematical knowledge could only be gained through deep conceptual understandings, was, and is, false. The parent who critiqued his child’s homework question understood this full well when he wrote, “In the real world, simplification is valued over complication.” This is the living truth of the technical engineering profession. Often trying to find simple mechanisms for how things work is much more effective and illuminating than is trying to find complex formulas for why they work. That certainly holds true in the early stages of education.

New Math failed and yet America was not buried under the tide of Communism. In fact, America’s technical edge only grew as the Cold War progressed. New Math failed, and Common Core math will fail, because the system they advocate does not take into account real world application and seeks to address a problem that does not exist. The problem of flagging math scores is not the methodology of teaching, but the entrenched power structures within the public education system.

The way to improve our country’s math scores is not to reinvent math, but to reform the teaching system at the administrative level. Tearing down corrosive traditions like tenure and seniority would go much farther to improve teaching than teaching Set Theory to elementary schoolers ever could.

Troubling Parallels: New Math De Ja Vu and the Common Core

Somewhat Reasonable - April 07, 2014, 9:16 AM

Storm clouds have been gathering around the Common Core for some time. Until now, most of the critical attention has been on the political ramifications of the program, that it centralizes and federalizes teaching, diminishing the power of parents to participate in the educational process. When the criticism does turn to the content of the curriculum, it usually focuses on social studies, such as Joy Pullmann’s excellent account of the Common Core’s trashing of the Constitution and Founding Fathers. Yet the Common Core’s treatment of math is proving to be even more questionable.

Judging from sample questions, Common Core math tries to reinvent the wheel in terms of the process of teaching. It focuses less on the teaching of problem solving and more on trying to teach overarching concepts. The result is math problems that are startlingly complex.

Teaching complex problem solving may sound like great news at first. Who could object to educating our children to have a deep conceptual understanding of things? After all, we need to keep ahead in the information and technology race with the rest of the world, do we not? The problem with that way of thinking was dealt with succinctly by one parent shocked and frustrated by his child’s Common Core homework assignment:

The problem with the question is that it transforms a subtraction problem that takes a single step to answer using conventional methods into a multi-step problem that only cause confusion. In trying to explain the “deep concept” to a second-grader the problem can serves only to confuse and upset. It seems Common Core is trying a top-down redesign of the whole process of learning, a redesign the complexity of which does not help to educate childrem, but instead leaves them in confused ignorance.

Remarkably, this is not the first time the government has tried just such a redesign of math education. In the 1960s, the government rolled out a very similar curriculum called New Math. New Math was built around the application of Set Theory and employed non-standard numeral systems in the hopes of instilling in students a conceptual understanding of “number.” The idea was that by ingraining a deep conceptual understanding of math, more advanced math knowledge could be taught more widely.

The impetus for the change in math education was a perceived knowledge gap in the late 1950s in the hard sciences and engineering between the United States and the Soviet Union. With the launch of Sputnik, American politicians and civic leaders began to fret that the Soviets were overtaking America in technical proficiency and came to believe that this gap would lead to devastating consequences for America in the Cold War. New Math was meant to build up the knowledge base of the American youth in order to compete.

Common Core math has been rolled out under very similar circumstances. Again America is facing a rising geopolitical foe, this time in the shape of China, a country which is experiencing frighteningly swift economic and technological growth. Much as New Math was meant to transform the educational system in order to compete with the perceived superiority of the Soviet  system, so too is the Common Core meant to challenge the technical rise of China and other developing powers.

Yet New Math, somewhat unsurprisingly, failed miserably to catch on. It came under immediate criticism from educators, parents, and concerned citizens. Perhaps one of the most well remembered criticisms was delivered by the legendary mathematician and singer Tom Lehrer, whose song “New Math” was a raucous take-down of the absurdities of New Math (see video above).

One reason New Math failed to work was that teachers had to be entirely reeducated themselves in order to understand the complexity of the teaching methodology. Who would have thought that second-grade math teachers would not all have a working knowledge of Set Theory?

Another reason New Math failed was that the underlying premise, that broad-based high-level and practical mathematical knowledge could only be gained through deep conceptual understandings, was, and is, false. The parent who critiqued his child’s homework question understood this full well when he wrote, “In the real world, simplification is valued over complication.” This is the living truth of the technical engineering profession. Often trying to find simple mechanisms for how things work is much more effective and illuminating than is trying to find complex formulas for why they work. That certainly holds true in the early stages of education.

New Math failed and yet America was not buried under the tide of Communism. In fact, America’s technical edge only grew as the Cold War progressed. New Math failed, and Common Core math will fail, because the system they advocate does not take into account real world application and seeks to address a problem that does not exist. The problem of flagging math scores is not the methodology of teaching, but the entrenched power structures within the public education system.

The way to improve our country’s math scores is not to reinvent math, but to reform the teaching system at the administrative level. Tearing down corrosive traditions like tenure and seniority would go much farther to improve teaching than teaching Set Theory to elementary schoolers ever could.

Categories: On the Blog

Virginia takes lead in patent reform

Out of the Storm News - April 07, 2014, 8:30 AM

As awareness builds about the cost in dollars and innovation that patent trolling extracts from the economy, Virginia has been among the states that have responded with legislation designed to counter frivolous patent suits while protecting legitimate patent holders.

Both chambers of the Virginia General Assembly unanimously passed bills designed to protect state businesses from patent infringement allegations that are frivolous or made in bad faith.

Patent trolls, or patent assertion entities, are companies or consortiums that acquire patents solely to coerce license fees or royalties from innovators who develop something similar. Relying often on vague, nonspecific claims of infringement, the entities threaten litigation, which can be prohibitively expensive for a start-up, to induce an out-of-court settlement. The most visible difference between a patent troll and a legitimate inventor is that trolls don’t make or market a product related to the patent in question.

Nationally, 7,000 businesses were sued by patent trolls in 2011 and 2012, four times as many as were sued in 2006, according to Michael Beckerman, president and CEO of the Internet Association, a trade group representing U.S. Internet companies. Counting direct payments to trolls, legal fees and other associated costs, troll litigation costs U.S. businesses $80 billion a year.

Many trolls are deep-pocketed, aggressive organizations with international reach. Some are state-sponsored, using patent assertion as a latter-day protectionist strategy either to extract payments from promising U.S. start-ups or impede their entry into their home markets. Taiwan’s Industrial Technology Research Institute holds more than 18,500 patents and has been asserting them in U.S. courts.

Italy’s Sisvel, with offices spread across seven countries, controls patents in 12 different technology standards pools. In the past, Sisvel’s attempts at theatric intimidation have involved bringing in armed guards to shut down 51 exhibitors at a major German trade show, alleging they were infringers.

Virginia’s legislation follows similar action in other states over the past several weeks in Kentucky, Oregon and Maine.

As patent assertion entities tend to target high-tech start-ups, many legislators are worried that trolling will adversely affect the technology business climate in their respective states. Virginia also reflects the general bipartisan concern. Attorney General Mark Herring, a Democrat, had significant input in the bills, which were shepherded through the Legislature by Sen. Richard Stuart and Del. Israel O’Quinn, both Republicans.

The bills authorize the attorney general to investigate cases of patent trolling and sue to recover civil penalties.

Recognizing that patent cases can often be complicated, the Virginia bills establish a set of standards that will aid in separating legitimate patent claims from trolling.

These standards target questionable elements commonly found in complaints from trolls, such as no identification of the actual patent holder, failure to specify how the defendant is infringing and a demand for unreasonably high license or royalty fees.

In Congress, the House of Representatives has already passed the Innovation Act, sponsored by Virginia Rep. Bob Goodlatte. Like the state bill, Goodlatte’s bill would require patent assertion entities to be specific about infringement claims.

The bill, which has been garnering bipartisan support on Capitol Hill, also would force plaintiffs to pay the defendant’s legal fees if the court finds claims to be frivolous. Multiple reform bills await action in the U.S. Senate, and President Barack Obama has come out in favor of patent reform.

There are encouraging signs that legislation and programs are working.

During the first two months of 2014, a total of 778 patent cases were filed, a 25 percent drop from the 1,038 cases filed during the first two months of last year, according to data from Lex Machina, a legal firm that specializes in helping companies fight trolls.

January’s monthly total of just 322 new cases was the lowest since October 2011, the firm reported.

By exploiting patent law, trolls sap U.S. businesses of energy and capital.

Virginia deserves praise for its leadership in stopping abuse and maintaining a fair and favorable business climate in the commonwealth.

How to get Americans back to work

Out of the Storm News - April 07, 2014, 8:00 AM

Friday’s Labor Department data shows an uptick in jobs, but an unemployment rate that remained steady from February to March. While the size of the labor force is increasing, the economy is not strong enough to get all would-be workers off the sidelines and into jobs.

Part of the story is that the fates of the short-term unemployed and the long-term unemployed have sharply diverged. The short-term unemployment rate, as Annie Lowrey of the New York Times has observed, is lower than its pre-recession level, while the long-term unemployment rate remains very high.

We need to find better ways to help the 3.7 million American workers who’ve been out of a job for six months, and the twice-as-large number of workers who are working part-time although they’d prefer full-time employment. But we would also do a great deal of good by ensuring that the short-term unemployed don’t remain on the sidelines for long.

That is why America needs wage insurance – a form of insurance that would subsidize a worker’s income if she were forced to take a job with a lower salary. The goal of wage insurance is to encourage workers to broaden their job search and to subsidize on-the-job training as they move from one kind of employment to another. A woman who worked in construction for most of her adult life might have a hard time transitioning to the hospitality industry, for example, and starting from scratch in an entry-level job would mean accepting a low wage. Wage insurance would cushion her and her family against this drop in income, and it would give her an opportunity to raise her skill level so that she could eventually command a higher wage from her employer.

Wage insurance was first introduced in 2005, by policy scholars Lael Brainard, Robert Litan and Nicholas Warren. The goal of the program was not to shield workers from all risk, but rather to provide them with a strong incentive for rapid re-employment. Workers who lose their jobs and then find jobs that pay less would receive an insurance payout that would cover up to 50 percent of the earnings gap, up to $10,000 a year for no more than two years.

The authors estimated that the program would cost roughly $3.5 billion a year (in 2005 dollars), and saw it as a way to protect the interests of workers permanently displaced by off-shoring and technological change.

Yet because the authors had no way of imagining the Great Recession and its impact, they ultimately understated the case for their proposal. Had we implemented a well-designed wage insurance program in the mid-2000s, we may have avoided much of the pain associated with the recent downturn.

To be sure, a wage insurance program would have cost more in recent years than Brainard, Litan and Warren had anticipated in 2005, particularly when the labor market was at its worst. But if the program had prevented millions of workers from entering the ranks of the long-term unemployed, it would have more than justified its expense.

One of the most attractive aspects of the proposal from Brainard, Litan and Warren is that it starts the clock on its two-year eligibility window after just a few weeks of unemployment. The sooner a person takes another job, the bigger the insurance payout she would ultimately receive. This provision would reduce the cost of traditional unemployment insurance while also limiting some of the damaging effects of being out of work.

Critics of the program worry more about “undermatching,” in which workers rush to take jobs for which they are overqualified, thus reducing their long-term earning potential. But the threat of undermatching must be balanced against the heavy economic and social costs of long-term unemployment. Wage insurance would reduce the costs associated with undermatching, and it wouldn’t prevent workers from returning to their old industries if or when they recover.

Granted, a new wage insurance program can’t do much to help the millions of workers who have already entered the ranks of the long-term unemployed. But it can spare future workers from the same fate.

Patent reform efforts shouldn’t overlook patent quality

Out of the Storm News - April 07, 2014, 7:30 AM

With the Senate Judiciary Committee set to take up legislation in the next several days that looks to combat so-called “patent trolls,” it’s imperative that lawmakers address the real underlying problem of low-quality patents, which give the trolls a platform to sue anyone and everyone.

There’s much to like about the Patent Transparency and Improvements Act, the primary bill under consideration in the Senate. Introduced by committee Chairman Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., and cosponsored by Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, the bill follows the path of the Innovation Act, which passed the U.S. House in December by an overwhelming 325-91 margin. Like the House bill, which has the support of the White House, it tackles a set of important litigation reforms, as well as addressing demand letters and transparency requirements for patent litigation and ownership.

But neither effort is comprehensive, especially when it comes to confronting bad patents. Notably, the worst offenders are software and business method patents. One study from George Mason University estimates 39 to 56 percent of software and business method patents would be found invalid if challenged. And when these kinds of infringement claims do go all the way to court, they almost always get shot down.  According to another study from the non-partisan Government Accountability Office, software-related patents are responsible for most of the increase in patent litigation in recent years (notably, the patentability of software currently is being considered by the Supreme Court).

Patent trolls have become a major economic drain, causing billions each year in economic damage. The targets are not just technology companies, but also many businesses you wouldn’t expect. For instance, one troll went after coffee shops, restaurants and hotels just for offering wireless Internet service. Another troll went after businesses for using scanners connected to an office network.

The list of dubious patents goes on and on. Complicating matters, non-disclosure requirements and lack of transparency for patent settlements make it difficult to assess the true scope of the problem.

Since litigation can cost millions per case, there’s often no practical way to challenge bogus infringement claims. This gives trolls a profitable racket extorting nuisance settlements from small businesses that can’t afford to fight back against bad patents. While litigation reforms like fee-shifting, customer-stay, and increased transparency will help mediate the trolls’ advantages in court, these changes won’t address the fundamental problem: that we need a better way to invalidate stupid patents.

During the markup process, we expect the Judiciary Committee to incorporate language from other proposals in the Senate, particularly a very strong bill put forward by Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas. Of the half-dozen bills in the Senate, we recommend a close look at one sponsored by Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., which is the only one that deals seriously with the underlying issue of patent quality.

Schumer’s idea goes back to the debate Congress had three years ago when it passed the America Invents Act, an earlier effort to reform the patent system. Coming only a decade after the federal circuit made “business methods” patentable, the law reflected the concern shared by many senators that we needed to curtail or eliminate these patents, as they allowed trolls set their sights on America’s financial institutions.

The final legislation included a provision from Schumer creating the covered business method (CBM) review program. This program offered a much cheaper alternative to litigation, making it practical to fight back against bad patents. But while the original debate was grander in scope, the final provision only covered a specific class of financial services patents, and had an expiration date in 2020.

Schumer’s current bill would expand the CBM program to other industries, and eliminate the sunset provision. While the original version of the House’s patent reform bill also had a provision expanding the CBM review program, large incumbent firms lobbied aggressively to remove it. Its opponents argued that it would unfairly subject them to an onslaught of challenges and delay their ability to shut down infringing competitors.

While they have real concerns, the systemic benefits of improving patent quality vastly outweigh them. Unfortunately, this may go down as a classic public choice failure, where those with concentrated benefits triumph over a multitude bearing dispersed costs.

In the end, our intellectual property system was created for the sole purpose of promoting innovation; for what the founders called “the Progress of Science and useful Arts.” The limited monopoly granted through the patent system is the means, not the end. And we should be very careful not to get those wires crossed if we want America to continue being the world’s technological leader.

Abusive patent litigation is a tax on innovation, not an incentive for it. In the final push for reform in Washington, lawmakers should address the root of the problem — not just treat the symptoms.

R Street’s Salam with FBI vet Michael German

Out of the Storm News - April 07, 2014, 7:00 AM

Over at the Vice Podcast, R Street’s Reihan Salam discusses how the FBI has changed since the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, with Michael German, a 16-year FBI veteran. Check out the video below:

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Organic Activists Need GMOs Now More Than Ever

Somewhat Reasonable - April 07, 2014, 5:40 AM

[NOTE: Patrick Moore, the co-founder of Greenpeace, is the co-author of this post.]

“Once an activist, always an activist.”

– The Activist’s Handbook: 1000 Ways to Politically and Socially Activate Your Life, Revolutionary Books, 2012.

You can’t separate the organic movement from the anti-GMO movement. They are one and the same, existing in perfect anti-technological symbiosis. What’s bad for GMOs is good for organics and vice versa.

With GMO labeling initiatives underway in 26 out of 50 states, and a global campaign to stop life-saving GM Golden Rice from being approved, you’re supposed to believe the leaders of the multibillion-dollar organic industry are just watching innocently from the sidelines. Nothing could be further from the truth. Once an activist, always an activist. And when Democratic State Senator Noreen Evans claims her GMO labeling bill – an idea that Californians already defeated once – is “agnostic on whether GMOs are good, or whether they are bad,” she’s lying. Since when do politicians label things for no reason?

The “GMO Free Mendocino” campaign was launched in Senator Evans’ district by Els Cooperrider, a founding member of the The Mendocino Organic Network, who succeeded in 2004 not merely in banning GMOs in Mendocino County, but in having all GMO crops destroyed by order of a federal judge. With the “organic” cause as the backbone of Cooperrider’s agricultural pogrom, Mendocino instantly became Grand Central for all subsequent anti-GMO movements.

Of course, organic activists like Cooperrider are opposed to a lot of things: synthetic fertilizer, pesticides, antibiotics, to name but a few. And yet, all these substances combined do not come close to the opposition reserved for GMOs.

And how exactly does one process Greenpeace’s campaign to abandon up to 500,000 children who go blind every year in the developing world from Vitamin-A deficiency? Only with vague arguments taken straight from Cooperrider’s manifesto, warning of as-yet unknown, unspecified risks to human health, the environment and organic farming. Greenpeace has succeeded in keeping GMO Vitamin-A enriched Golden Rice from being approved for humanitarian use in spite of support for this life-saving crop from the Bill and Melinda Gate Foundation and many other charitable organizations.

Still think Sen. Evans is agnostic on GMOs?

The science of genetic engineering gave diabetics synthetic human insulin which replaced insulin from slaughtered pigs. Try to imagine someone blocking genetically-synthesized human insulin, or labeling it to encourage use of the “organic” alternative. It’s unthinkable given the high rate of diabetes in North America and Europe.

Whether they seek to ban or label GMOs, organic activists are pretending to protect consumers for their own good even though no negative effect has ever been observed from any approved GM food. Meanwhile, these very same people insist only that synthetic fertilizer, pesticides and antibiotics not be used on organic farms. They do not demand bans or labels on conventional crops grown with these approved substances.

But for all the half-baked arguments against Golden Rice along with demands for the useless labeling of foods that have contained GMO ingredients for close to 20 years now, the fact is that organic and Greenpeace activists actually need GMOs. They’re quite content to continue to “co-exist” right alongside their avowed arch nemesis because it provides a vital element to their continued existence as activists.

This is why labeling campaigns have all but replaced campaigns to ban GMOs just 10-short years after Cooperrider’s runaway “success.” It also explains, incidentally, why outwardly anti-GMO Europe routinely accepts huge shipments of GM crops from America for livestock feed. Banning GMOs is the last thing on organic politicians’ and activists’ minds. They just want to control GMOs, and to that end labeling provides the perfect balance.

GMOs will remain in circulation to scare consumers, while growth in the GMO sector is severely limited under a labeling regime, so much so that fewer and fewer corporations will develop new GMO crops, thus guaranteeing that this still untapped field of science never becomes fully accepted by the masses. Existing GMO crops will continue to either be highly restricted as in Europe, or labeled like a package of cigarettes here in America, while a new crop like Golden Rice is just best left on the back burner while every possible angle on its side-effects is studied to death… literally!

It’s like the joke about the drunk looking for a contact lens under a lamppost outside a bar one night. A passerby stops to lend a hand, and after 20 minutes finally asks, “Are you sure you lost it under this lamppost?” The drunk replies, “No… it was that one over there.” The passerby is stunned. “Then why are we looking under this lamppost?” To which the drunk replies, “Because the light’s better!”

Meanwhile, rather than test organic crops to ensure they’re free of synthetic fertilizer, pesticides and antibiotics, voluntary record-keeping and record-checking is relied upon to supposedly keep all those substances out of premium-priced organic food. Then, before anyone notices this is nothing more than a multibillion-dollar honor-based marketing scheme, the leaders of the organic industry move quickly to where the light is better, attacking GMOs as “Frankenfoods,” accompanied by constant chatter about GMOs contaminating organic crops. It turns out there’s no such thing as “contamination” of an organic crop by GMOs.

Such “contamination” – when it occurs at all – has always been well below one-one-hundredth of a percentage point. More to the point, if they were worried about GMOs “contaminating” organic fields, why didn’t anti-GMO organic activists say so in their own standards for organic production, standards which they quite literally wrote themselves!

Clearly, anti-GMO organic activists were utterly unconcerned with GMOs right from the get-go, only deciding it was expedient to feign concern over GMO “contamination” long after the rules were established, after billions of dollars in certified-organic royalties had been collected by these activists to fund their cause. Meanwhile, studies show pesticide contamination-levels in excess of 40 percent in certified-organic products. Maybe read that sentence again if you buy organic food.

Now you know why GMO labeling initiatives, along with Greenpeace’s campaign to keep Golden Rice from reaching some very needy people, always point to the harm GMOs supposedly inflict on organic farmers. Examples are never provided. How curious. Curiouser still that reporters never ask for examples. Why, it’s almost as if reporters have never bothered to read America’s organic standards. Maybe read this paragraph again if you’re a reporter.

Labeling, as opposed to banning, makes the light all the brighter under the anti-GMO organic lamppost. And with the exception of Golden Rice – the exception that proves the rule – organic activists will never again seek to have GMOs banned as they were in Mendocino. GMOs represent a highly effective straw man for organic activists, driving revenues for Greenpeace and the global organic movement to fund yet more misguided, tax-subsidized anti-GMO campaigns.

Organic activists need GMOs the same way the Soviets needed decadent America during the Cold War. Without something plausible, never mind credible, to stand opposed to, they would collapse under the unverifiable weight of their own propaganda. Of course, as with the Cold War, innocent civilians will be sacrificed on the road to Utopia. In this case, it’s a couple million people a year in the Third World dying from Vitamin-A deficiency, along with up to 500,000 kids going blind.

When warlords and organic-munching environmentalists conspire to commit genocide in far off lands, at least the warlords don’t pretend it’s for the good of the planet.

[First posted at the Daily Caller.]

Categories: On the Blog

Organic activists need GMOs now more than ever

Stuff We Wish We Wrote - Homepage - April 06, 2014, 3:08 AM
GMO labeling, Mischa Popoff, Patrick Moore
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