Algebra Texts that Fail

Algebra Texts that Fail
November 1, 1998



Reviewers from Mathematically Correct say the following F-rated and D-rated algebra textbooks should never be considered for use in schools:

Cord Algebra I: Mathematics in Context

The Center for Occupational Research and Development

(South-Western Educational Publishing/ITP, 1998)

"The book provides a poor opportunity for student learning, with support for only basic levels of achievement. The appropriateness of the use of technology and the emphasis on analytical methods are good, but the mathematics content coverage and depth are seriously insufficient. This is most clearly reflected in insufficient student work in exercises and the low expectations for student achievement that the problems seem to assume."

Addison-Wesley Secondary Math: Focus on Algebra

Randall Charles, Alba Gonzalez Thompson, Trudi Hammel Garland, et al.

(Scott Foresman/Addison-Wesley, 1998)

"This book provides a poor opportunity for student learning, even at a less-than-comprehensive level. The sequence of presentation is reasonable for the material covered, but the mathematics content coverage and depth are insufficient. The treatment of functions, exponents, and radicals are especially poor. In general, both the presentation and the student work seriously lack sufficient breadth and depth needed for success at moderate levels.”

Algebra I: Explorations and Applications

Richard G. Brown, Miriam A. Leiva, Loring Coes III, et al.

(McDougal Littell, 1998)

"Linear Functions: This topic is treated poorly. The exposition appears to be the worst of all possible worlds. Subtopics begin with an exploration that is not much more than playing with a calculator. . . . Calculators are used mindlessly when real understanding would make the use of calculators unnecessary.”

Addison-Wesley Secondary Math: Foundations of Algebra and Geometry

Cathy L. Seeley, Barbara Alcala, Penelope P. Booth, et al.

(Scott Foresman/Addison-Wesley, 1996)

"This book is so deficient in content that it should never be considered for use in introductory algebra.”