WI Voucher Attacks, LA Legal Wrangling, and More: Friday's Ed News Roundup

WI Voucher Attacks, LA Legal Wrangling, and More: Friday's Ed News Roundup
November 1, 2013

Joy Pullmann

Joy Pullmann is a research fellow on education policy for The Heartland Institute and managing... (read full bio)

Friday's ed news

WISCONSIN: The state department of education constantly attempts to undermine Wisconsin’s vouchers program, says a new report.

LOUISIANA: More legal wrangling in the Obama administration’s lawsuit against vouchers for poor black kids. This time, the administration says the state wants it to cough up too much paperwork.

WISCONSIN: Why the first voucher program in the nation doesn’t get particularly good results.

MILITARY: More military families are turning to homeschooling, and bases have begun to support their choice.

TEACHING: Why kids need to memorize lots of facts. 

COMMON CORE: Why computer programs that assign “text complexity” really don’t get it.

BACKGROUND CHECKS: Unions want loopholes in a proposed national background check system for teachers.

NEW MEXICO: The governor and state superintendent want to set up online “parent portals” that track student information into one database

 

Thursday's ed news

CALIFORNIA: The U.S. education secretary threatens to take $3.5 billion from California for deciding to ditch state tests for Common Core. 

EDTECH: Pediatricians are trying to get parents to reduce their kids' screen time.

HISTORY: It's spooky how little U.S. schools care about history instruction.

COMMON CORE: The upcoming national tests are prompting schools to spend millions on computers and tech infrastructure. 

NEW MEXICO: The state teachers union won't sign on to a renewal of its No Child Left Behind waiver until the union gets new laws it wants. 

MARYLAND: The state is $50 billion in the hole for teacher pensions and healthcare. 

PENNSYLVANIA: The teachers union demands more money while itself offering none to get teachers back in Philadelphia schools. 

WISCONSIN: Five teachers file a lawsuit demanding secret ballots for union elections.

MICHIGAN: Lawmakers consider holding kids back if they can't read in third grade. 

 

Wednesday's ed news

PARENT RIGHTS: The U.S. Senate will soon consider a United Nations treaty that displaces parent rights over children in education and otherwise.  

RHODE ISLAND: A poll finds majorities of Democrats and Independents in the state support vouchers and education tax credits.

SURVEILLANCE STATE: Schools start hiring companies to monitor what students say and do online.

COLORADO: Uber-wealthy out-of-staters are supporting a ballot campaign to raise taxes ostensibly to pay more for education.

TEACHERS: A new study finds teachers' academic preparation has improved somewhat from its spot at the bottom of the barrel.

EDTECH: Apple, Inc. says it has 94 percent of the education market

MICHIGAN: The average Detroit student misses one day of school every week, says a union president. 

NEW JERSEY: A school district cancels Common Core tests after someone anonymously posted several online. 

 

Tuesday's ed news

DEMOGRAPHICS: The nation will soon have a boom in old and young; since both groups consume most of government spending, this will create a huge strain on taxpayers.

OREGON: A school district allows teachers to bear arms in school.

CHOICE: Several states are interested in Arizona’s pioneering education savings accounts.

SOUTH DAKOTA: It will cost the state more money than a federal grant is worth to keep the grant.

INDIA: Poor parents greatly prefer private schools.

BOYS: How schools can help boys succeed—and they need all the help they can get.

LIBERAL ARTS VS. TECH: Why employers want both communication and technical skills.

ALABAMA: Yet another state makes yet another meaningless non-change to Common Core

 

Monday's ed news

LOUISIANA: Thirty U.S. Senators write the Obama administration to protest its lawsuit against vouchers that help poor kids escape failing schools. 

INDIANA: State superintendent Glenda Ritz appears to have chaired the meeting she sued the state board for having without her.  

BULLYING: A national poll finds online bullying has declined

NEVADA, MASSACHUSETTS: Communities mourn slain teachers

PRIVATE SCHOOLS: Why teachers will take a large pay cut to work in private schools. 

TECH: More very young children are using computers more often, a survey finds

WISCONSIN: Half of online schools get low marks for student performance. 

NEW YORK: The department of education makes some concessions on the number of state tests students must take.

NEW MEXICO: Teachers unions are agitating against a new statewide evaluation system

NEW JERSEY: A school district tries out social reprogramming on preschoolers

 

For last week's School Reform News roundup, click here.
For other top-notch school reform news selections, visit: 

Image by Mo Riza.

Joy Pullmann

Joy Pullmann is a research fellow on education policy for The Heartland Institute and managing... (read full bio)